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Author: Subject: Guns and Roses 12-8-11 Indy Review

Maximum Peach





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  posted on 12/9/2011 at 07:35 AM
I thought about and would have liked to have went ,but the late starting time and me having to be up at 4:30am to go to work ,I just could not have made it happen. I'm getting old!!! .


I looked within the last 2 wks and decent seats still available and they still had SRO down in front of the stage.

I was kinda wondering how sales were. For this show it mentioned in the review that only
8,000 were in attendance. I am just wondering thats cause of the late starting time, how relevant are GNR anymore or other issues. Conseco I think can hold a little more than 18,000 for a basketball game. I know that would be cut down a little for a show ,but there are floor seats and SRO area in front of the stage. I am just wondering if poor attendance on this tour for theses guys will dampen anymore future tours 20yrs from now.

Anyways here is the review
http://www.indystar.com/article/20111209/ENTERTAINMENT/111209006/Axl-Rose-u ses-his-Illusion-great-effect?odyssey=tab|topnews|img|IndyStar.com

It's fitting that Guns N' Roses was on tour to promote its "Use Your Illusion" albums (the concurrently released "I" and "II") the last time the rock band played a show in Indiana.

Nearly 20 years later, the songs of "Illusion" represented the best moments of Thursday's sprawling Guns N' Roses concert at Conseco Fieldhouse.

Larger-than-life ballads "November Rain," "Estranged" and "Don't Cry" sounded timeless while generating waves of adulation from an estimated audience of 8,000.


Aside from vocalist Axl Rose and keyboard player Dizzy Reed, the personnel of Guns N' Roses is completely different when compared to that 1992 performance at the Hoosier Dome.


Former lead guitarist Slash and rhythm guitarist Izzy Stradlin (who technically exited GNR in 1991) have given way to a three-headed lead/rhythm brigade of Dj Ashba, Ron "Bumblefoot" Thal and Richard Fortus. Duff McKagen is out on bass, and Tommy Stinson is in. On drums, Matt Sorum has been replaced by Frank Ferrer. And Chris Pitman is a keyboard player to augment Reed.


Rose didn't build the band's current roster to replicate the street-metal surge of 1987's "Appetite for Destruction," and what's salvageable from the 15-years-in-the-making "Chinese Democracy" project of 2008 seems to be a continuation of the "Illusion" era.


Rose assembled his eight-member team with "Illusion" in mind: Performances are simultaneously epic and tender, focused and finessed.


It would be a stretch to argue that the "Illusion" albums are "better" than "Appetite for Destruction." Guns N' Roses probably wouldn't have been voted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame this week without the game-changing impact of "Appetite."


But Rose made his most daring artistic explorations during the "Illusion" era, and the current band is better equipped to execute that vision -- especially in light of the strained working relationships of Rose, Slash and Stradlin in the early 1990s.


Bumblefoot's clean, fluid guitar solo during "Estranged" wasn't the work of any mop-up player, and Rose's entire supporting cast gave "You Could Be Mine" an engaging industrial texture reminiscent of Ministry or White Zombie.




Rose's voice proved to be warmed up and wide open for two notable cover songs from the "Illusion" era: Paul McCartney's "Live and Let Die" and Bob Dylan's "Knockin' on Heaven's Door."


Regarding "Chinese Democracy," the ballads "Street of Dreams" and "This I Love" fared better in concert than a smattering of tracks that hinted at Rose grasping for a clue while the New Metal revolution rose and fell during the past decade.


The crowd-pleasing hits of "Appetite" came across as nostalgic larks.


Rose revived the dance moves of his younger self, confetti flooded the arena during show-closing "Paradise City," and Monticello, Ind., native Ashba played Slash's distinctive opening riffs to "Welcome to the Jungle" and "Sweet Child of Mine" with ease.


Rose -- who grew up in Lafayette, Ind., and once compared his home state to the Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz -- complimented the Indianapolis audience for its "warm and welcoming" nature. He called Conseco Fieldhouse a "great building," and said the band would try to make it back to Indiana before another 19 years pass.


Unlike many headlining acts that call it a night after 90 minutes on stage (or even 75 in some alarming instances), Guns N' Roses performed for 2 hours and 53 minutes.


If an edit is in order, a cover of Pink Floyd's "Another Brick in the Wall (Part 2)" can be left in the rehearsal room. Within minutes, "November Rain" made the '70s hit appear puny.


The show didn't begin until 11 p.m., but the start time wasn't a minute later than planned.



[Edited on 12/9/2011 by jszfunk]

 

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Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 12/9/2011 at 10:30 AM
jzfunk, you're not getting old Axl is so removed from reality that he not only is hurting the GnR brand but what's left of rock in general IMO. I personally think that certainly the smaller venues need to adopt a work day policy. Start earlier and end earlier to accomodate the patrons and improve the bottom line. Starting a concert at 11:00 pm in anyplace other than New Orleans or New York is preposterous. I'd imagine at only 8,000 in attendance then somebody is bleeding either GnR or the promoter. Either way it won't continue and may discourage the promotion of other "rock" acts.

 

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Maximum Peach



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  posted on 12/9/2011 at 11:07 AM
Both who have posted here have said that 8,000 in attendance is a puny turnout. C'mon, get a grip on reality! For a band that has ONE original member on board and other than the 10 or 15 years in the making Chinese Democracy, really hasn't done a damn thing since they broke up in, what, 1991? Deep Purple couldn't pull 8,000, I just saw them last summer; I seriously doubt ABB could either, and both bands have been CONTINUOUSLY active for the last 20 years. When you consider that, 8,000 is really an incredible draw and evidence of Guns 'n' Roses' staying power; let's not forget that they were the biggest band in the world for about 3 years. And based on the revue that jszfunk posted, I would love to see this band. I'll agree though, I wouldn't want to stick around until 2:00 AM to hear them.

 

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  posted on 12/9/2011 at 11:44 AM
here's a review from last week:


The Delaware County Daily Times (delcotimes.com), Serving Delaware County, PA

Entertainment
Rock Music Menu: Guns N’ Roses: OK but not great

Saturday, December 3, 2011

By MICHAEL CHRISTOPHER
Rockmusicmenu@hotmail.com

Twenty years. That’s how long it has taken the latest incarnation of Guns N’ Roses to make its way back to the region. Better late than never was the vibe at the Susquehanna Bank Center in Camden last Saturday where fans were treated to a mixed bag of nostalgia, absurdity and shame.

There was no riot, as frontman Axl Rose turned up — unlike the no-show turned riot at the First Union Center in December 2002, which wasn’t even mentioned, alluded to or apologized for this time around. On the flipside, nor was it the endless burst of energy and air of unpredictability that filled the scorching mid-December two-night stand at the Spectrum in 1991.

Guns went on 11 p.m. on the dot Saturday, which makes the going-on-late game by Axl appear to be more of a controlled standard these days. The start time is also easier to digest when you get a three-hour concert out of it, but when a majority of the audience is fast-approaching middle age; it still puts a damper on things, which was probably why there were spates of mass-exiting throughout the set.

The song selection was hard to argue with; opening with the title track to the long awaited “Chinese Democracy,” it was “Welcome to the Jungle” that followed it which had the audience really paying attention. Newer tracks were sprinkled sparingly throughout a run of classics that included “Nightrain,” “Rocket Queen,” “Don’t Cry” and “Mr. Brownstone.”

The high point was “Estranged,” pulled from “Use Your Illusion II,” an epic ballad that might be the best in the band’s catalog. Breaking out AC/DC’s “Whole Lotta Rosie” wasn’t too shabby; neither was doing seven tracks from one of the greatest debuts in history, “Appetite for Destruction.”

Looking less-like the Los Angeles sleaze of yore and more like a Sunset Strip pimp, Rose was in fine form both vocally and in enthusiasm. Zooming back and forth across the stage, he was outfitted in an ever-changing array of fedoras, leather jackets and sunglasses that came off just once.

Detracting from a complete command over the crowd was his frequent dashes to a tent set up at stage left, which is where the singer’s oxygen is rumored to be housed. I lost count somewhere around 50, but the continued disappearing act led a fellow concert attendee to remark that maybe Axl wasn’t getting hits of oxygen, but actually watching a show on the Oxygen channel.

He certainly had the time for it, as there were bloated solo spots for each member of the band. Three guitarists meant three solos. Bass player Tommy Stinson sang a cover of “Sonic Reducer” by Dead Boys. Pianist Dizzy Reed did a version of The Who’s “Baba O’Reily.” Rose himself did a piano solo where he dropped in snippets of Elton John classics. There were also four completely unnecessary instrumental jams.

Suddenly, three hours looks less like an impressive show of endurance and more of a cumbersome effort to stretch things to the breaking point, for instance, the growing number of yawns from concertgoers whose interest was waning with each spot.

DJ Ashba, who also plays guitar in Motley Crue bassist Nikki Sixx’s Sixx A.M. project, ran around the stage with a fair amount of animation. He also sports a mini-version of a top-hat and perpetually has a cigarette dangling from his lips. Sound familiar? That’s probably why more than one person was overheard referring to him as “Fake Slash,” “Wannabe Slash” “DJ Slashba” and “Slash Junior.” Ashba also broke the cardinal rule by wearing a Guns N’ Roses t-shirt. The Hot Topic fingerless skull gloves didn’t help matters either.

Guitarist Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal was the worst offender though. His mannerisms oozed with an alarming amount of inauthenticity. During “Live and Let Die,” he actually ran to the back of the stage where the flash pots were spouting fire and posed for a picture for the band photographer in the wings, turning his back to the crowd. Talk about fabricated moves; but it’ll look great in the resume for future gigs. When it was time for the solo for “Sweet Child O’ Mine,” Bumblefoot had his eyes closed, ostensibly lost in the feel of the moment, opened them briefly to peek at the reaction he was getting then quickly shut them again, disparaging the atmosphere.

Add that to his continuous tongue in cheek, staggered mock guitar god stances and endless beard stroking, it’s obvious that Thal is in it for the paycheck, and he does it with zero feel and the charisma of a soapdish.

It wasn’t all bad, as former Love Spit Love guitarist Richard Fortus either faked it the best or legitimately had his heart in the proceedings. His energy never abated, he was like an animated fireball, and if there ever is any sort of original Guns N’ Roses reunion, Izzy Stradlin would probably decline to take part and Fortus should be the go to replacement.

But the more the show went on, the more it was clear that this was like a Guns N’ Roses revue, similar to what a bunch of the old-Motown acts do where there is one or less founding member representing. Many in the audience were there for the curiosity element, which leaves the future of the outfit very much in doubt — because there certainly isn’t enough chemistry to sustain any long term interest.

 

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