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Author: Subject: Is The Tedeschi Trucks Band the Best American Group Working Today?

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  posted on 9/22/2012 at 11:46 AM
http://www.nodepression.com/profiles/blogs/is-tedeschi-trucks-the-best-amer ican-group-working-today

Is The Tedeschi Trucks Band the Best American Group Working Today?
Posted by Kevin Lynch on September 19, 2012 at 3:30pmView Blog.

When Susan Tedeschi joined forces with Derek Trucks their combined surnames hardly made for a mellifluous moniker. But this crew is doing some of the heaviest lifting in contemporary music today, and delivering the goods to fresh and fertile places.
Their name’s assonance may grind like a 16 wheeler, but The Tedeschi Trucks Band hauls loads of subtle artistry along with its pile of stylistic influences. And with the results, I say, keep on truckin’.
Is Tedeschi-Trucks the best American band on the road today?
I can't remember the last time I've felt compelled to ask such a question about a performing group, especially one who has only one studio album and one live recording.
It’s exciting to anticipate that they figure to have their best music ahead of them. Which is why, as they come close to the end of a long American tour (the final date is Oct. 27) it’s high time to assess this group’s startling impact. This sense of their fast ascendance is hardly just my impression or opinion. Consider the remarkably impressive average rating of the band’s current tour: 4 and one half out of five stars in 756 customer reviews on Ticketmaster. And 91% of these said they would recommend the show to a friend.
To fortify that live-concert poll, I’ll consider material that my blog readers can refer to: the band’s one studio album Revelator, their live recording Everybody’s Talkin’ and a number of You Tubes of concert footage.
Along with the extraordinary quality of the Grammy-winning studio recording, this group has become a phenomenon because of its in-concert range and dynamism. That’s demonstrated on the two record set Everybody’s Talkin’ album, which may find a ranking among extraordinary two-record live rock albums worthy of their length: Bob Dylan’s The Royal Albert Hall Concert, Cream’s Wheels of Fire, The Grateful Dead's Live Dead, Santana's three-record set Lotus and the Allman Brothers’ Live at the Fillmore East.
I first got a sense of this group's live potential when I saw them do Junior Wells’ “Little by Little” and Eric Clapton's “Any Day” in the DVD of Clapton's 2007 Crossroads Guitar Festival, when the couple toured with the current band’s predecessor, The Soul Stew Revival.

It was clearly evident how these performers could revitalize classic material with their cross-vernacular spin. “Any Day” was right in their wheelhouse, being from the Layla album by Derek and the Dominoes (a.k.a. Eric Clapton, Duane Allman and friends) which is a primary touchstone for guitarist Trucks’ style. (Trucks was named by his father -- original Allman Brothers drummer Butch Trucks -- for the Layla band’s mythical “Derek,” and Allman is admittedly his main guitar influence, along with Elmore James.) Here vocalist Mike Mattison shows his singing chops by sharing the lead vocals with Tedeschi. Truck’s solo climbs through vintage Allman Brothers licks -- a hot melding of Duane Allman’s blues intensity and Dickey Betts’ lyrical ardor -- and climaxes with some intoxicatingly woozy chords. It’s a performance that clearly gasses Clapton himself and emcee Bill Murray, among others, from the side stage.
I played this video for my cultural journalism class at Edgewood College and my students loved it. A couple of them came up to me afterwards and told me how much they enjoyed it, a rare occurrence.
Then came the band’s first album Revelator and, among other accolades, a Grammy award -- which is not always an indication of the best recording in a given category. But in this case TTB’s 2012 Grammy for Best Blues Album indicates something that expands the blues category to its outer limits. And yet virtually nothing this group plays sounds outré or pretentious, unlike some of today’s big rock-pop acts, whose ambition can sometimes waterlog their artistry.
Okay let's start with the core of the talent. How many would argue that this group doesn't have the best combination of lead singer and lead instrumentalist of any group on the circuit today?

SUSAN TEDESCHI-- The ravaged emotive textures that crawl out of her throat prompt the apt comparisons to Janis Joplin and Bonnie Raitt. But another predecessor dwells deeply in her style -- Tracy Nelson, a still underappreciated contemporary of Raitt and Joplin. This is most evident in the bright, clarion alto that seems the real vortex of Tedeschi’s voice.
Susan Tedeschi belts one out.
Nelson has long melded gospel, blues, rock and country, often with almost religious fervor, by contrast to the more secular sensibilities of Joplin and Raitt. Tedeschi often conveys a powerful sense of testifying, a pursuit of grace and redemption that feels authentic, especially in a song like the funky roof-raiser “Bound for Glory.” But also hear “These Walls,” about an impoverished woman who’s scuffling mightily since her man left. She prays “Oh Lord, don’t let these walls fall down.” Raised as a Catholic, Tedeschi found little inspiration in the church choir, so she attended predominantly African-American Baptist churches, feeling the music was "less repressed and more like a celebration of God." At the Berklee School of Music she sang in a gospel choir.
Yet the auburn-tressed Tedeschi hardly comes across as a church mouse. Onstage she’s open-hearted, tough, sensual and earthy -- thus heightening the proverbial Saturday night/Sunday morning dichotomy of the classic gospel experience.
Yet as a mother of two, she shows no traces of, say, Joplin’s self-destructively desperate sexuality. And as an accomplished singer-songwriter-guitarist and bandleader of men in her own right, Tedeschi’s her own definition of a 21st-century liberated woman. If only Joplin could’ve lived to learn from her musical progeny’s apparently self-possessed wisdom. Being a Yankee from Boston (like fellow singer Mike Mattison, a Minneapolis-born black man) Tedeschi defies the estimable Muddy Waters dictum that “white kids…cannot vocal like the black man.” We know it ain’t a province of gender and today at least a few white Northern kids seem able to genuinely vocal the blues, perhaps because they did grow up in the culture, even if it was a conscious yet instinctive choice, as Susan’s was.

DEREK TRUCKS – He played with the Allman Brothers band as a young guitar slinger, and learned virtually all his primary bottleneck slide technique from the short-lived Duane Allman, mostly by poring over recordings and videos of the group. He was eight when Allman died in 1979 but Trucks had the virtuosic blues-jazz style down by 1993 (see you tube video).

He retains a strong musical relationship with guitarist Warren Haynes who replaced Allman in the legendary band from Macon, Georgia that redefined Southern rock music virtually single-handedly. He was among the youngest ever to receive a Lifetime Achievement Grammy award this year, along with ten other members of the Allman Brothers Band.
Trucks is ranked 16 in Rolling Stone magazine’s 2001 list of 100 Greatest Guitarists. At 32, he’s also easily the youngest among the top 20, suggesting the potential he has shown on Revelator and the groups long current tour. 2 Consider also that Trucks, Gary Clark Jr. and Trombone Shorty represented a new generation of blues musicians when the guitarist and Tedeschi (who’s nine years his elder) played for President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama and guests on for the PBS TV “In Performance at the White House” series on February 21. Showcasing the importance of the blues in American culture, the event also featured B.B. King, Buddy Guy, Shemekia Copeland, Keb Mo, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and other major blues musicians.
As an implicit seal of approval, King, surely the greatest living blues musician, has been performing on some dates of the Tedeschi Trucks current tour.

SONGWRITING– Perhaps the most surprising aspect of Revelator was that all 13 titles were originals written by this band. This was as crucial to the new partnership as their performing prowess. On Trucks’ previous band’s albums “Songlines,” and “Already Free,” (which earned him his first Grammy for Best Contemporary Blues Album) Trucks says he “was interested in making more song-driven records, and Revelator is another step in that direction.
“We have great players in this band, and everyone gets a chance to shine on this recording without straying from the focus of the album. It’s all about serving the song, supporting what Susan’s doing and building the whole sound up into something bigger than our own individual input.”
The band’s dynamics and songwriting skills are exemplified by “Midnight in Harlem,” a swaying, moon-lit melody and vividly rendered lyric: I went down to the river/and I took a look around/There were old man's shoes/There were needles on the ground… which also reveals Tedeschi’s Bonnie Raitt-esque sensitivity and Trucks’ mastery of the Allman brothers’ lyrical strain in a jazzy groove.

 
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  posted on 9/22/2012 at 11:58 AM
To answer the question, no, that would be Gov't Mule.

 

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  posted on 9/22/2012 at 03:53 PM
quote:
Trucks was named by his father -- original Allman Brothers drummer Butch Trucks --

fact checker, please

after the Boston and Scranton shows this summer, I'd have to say that the best working band is once again the Allman Brothers, although TTB is near the top of my personal list.

 

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  posted on 9/22/2012 at 04:25 PM
Trombone Shorty & Orleans avenue....

http://youtu.be/JRFgAHBFujc

From PBS' "Austin City Limits"...5:34 of pure bliss...

Seen this guys twice and they've blown the roof off both times....

For my money, here is a band that has it's sh* t down, Funk, swing and Bop...Imho, all the things ttb should and could be....

My vote for, "the Best American Group Working Today"

 

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  posted on 9/22/2012 at 04:37 PM
quote:

To answer the question, no, that would be Gov't Mule.


You beat me to it, Ron. Just saw the Mule last night.

 

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  posted on 9/22/2012 at 04:47 PM
He lost me after this gem:

That’s demonstrated on the two record set Everybody’s Talkin’ album, which may find a ranking among extraordinary two-record live rock albums worthy of their length: Bob Dylan’s The Royal Albert Hall Concert, Cream’s Wheels of Fire, The Grateful Dead's Live Dead, Santana's three-record set Lotus and the Allman Brothers’ Live at the Fillmore East.

I cannot say any other reviewer of the album has said anything this far fetched.

 

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  posted on 9/22/2012 at 05:35 PM
quote:
quote:

To answer the question, no, that would be Gov't Mule.


You beat me to it, Ron. Just saw the Mule last night.



AMEN...!

 

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  posted on 9/22/2012 at 05:38 PM
quote:
quote:

To answer the question, no, that would be Gov't Mule.


You beat me to it, Ron. Just saw the Mule last night.



We'll see Warren & Co. in Ithaca 10/27.

There's my Mule!!!

 

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  posted on 9/22/2012 at 09:03 PM
quote:
To answer the question, no, that would be Gov't Mule.


On this we totally agree!

 

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  posted on 9/22/2012 at 10:01 PM
quote:
...and learned virtually all his primary bottleneck slide technique from the short-lived Duane Allman, mostly by poring over recordings and videos of the group.


I'm gonna be picky about this and say I disagree, as it seems a little too pigeon-holey.

 

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  posted on 9/22/2012 at 10:14 PM
So many to choose from so I'll give my top 5

Umphreys McGee
Wilco
Gov't Mule
Tedeschi Trucks Band
Chris Robinson Brotherhood

 

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  posted on 9/22/2012 at 10:20 PM
No, not as long as the Bruce and the E. St. Band are still around.
Dave Matthews Band has to get props as one of the most popular and hardest working bands around, too.

 

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  posted on 9/23/2012 at 12:05 AM
from his review i think he claims to be a proffesor? but his facts are .....well.....we doesn't know what he's talking about. so many errors.
 

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  posted on 9/23/2012 at 12:36 AM
I appreciate his enthusiasm, but he is SO wrong about so many things, it truly boggles the mind.

"He was eight when Allman died in 1979 but Trucks had the virtuosic blues-jazz style down by 1993"

Duane died in 1971, and Derek hadn't even been born in 1979. I really don't know where he came up with that. Any Derek Youtube clip from 1993 clearly shows a young child, not a 22-year-old man. You have to try really, really hard to be THAT wrong about anything.

"He retains a strong musical relationship with guitarist Warren Haynes who replaced Allman in the legendary band from Macon, Georgia that redefined Southern rock music virtually single-handedly."

The most basic Google search would have shown the writer he was wrong on this. Don't they have editors anymore?

Since others are chiming in on this angle, I'll say Lettuce is the best American band working today.

 
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  posted on 9/23/2012 at 08:47 AM
I'll have to say Gov't Mule also

 

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  posted on 9/24/2012 at 04:56 PM
saw The Infamous Stringdusters yesterday and man, they tore it up. They're on my top list right now, too
 

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  posted on 9/24/2012 at 05:42 PM
I saw a band this weekend at Music Midtown in Atlanta that might have a legit claim to the title. I had never seen them before, but they really impressed me. A little band from Seattle called Pearl Jam, maybe you've heard of them

I was very impressed with guitarists Mike McCready and Stone Gossard, and they lived up to their reputation as a great live band. I don't know a lot of their recent material, but the classics like "Evenflow" still hold up very well. They really jammed that one out, and several songs had smoking hot guitar solos any Allmans fan could appreciate.

I am still not sold on the whinier, more ballad-ish side of their catalog, but when they want to be, they are a damn good rock band. They closed with a ripping "Rocking In The Free World" that packed a serious punch.

I'd never really thought of Pearl Jam as being in that elite class, but I think I underestimated them. 20 years with the same lineup and no breakups, very devoted fanbase, excellent songs and solid musicianship. What's not to like?

 
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  posted on 9/24/2012 at 07:19 PM
Yes, Top of the heap in Division II.

 

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  posted on 9/24/2012 at 07:33 PM
quote:
To answer the question, no, that would be Gov't Mule.


Where's the "like" button?

 

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  posted on 9/24/2012 at 07:41 PM
this guy is really reaching....


http://www.nodepression.com/profiles/blogs/tedeschi-trucks-band-part-2-a-co mparison-and-a-closer-look

Is Tedeschi Trucks Band the Best?, Part 2 - A Comparison and a Closer Look

Posted by Kevin Lynch on September 20, 2012 at 7:00am
View Blog."Revelator," TTB's debut album, won the 2012 Grammy for Best Blues Album

COMPARISON – So what other current American vernacular music group might be a contender for the best band on the scene today? Plenty of you may make staunch cases for innovative and artful bands like Wilco, My Morning Jacket, The Hold Steady, The National, The Drive-By Truckers and others.
But another band, like TTB, plumbs and propels roots-music genres with rare artistry. Alison Krauss & Union Station also boasts a great female lead singer/instrumentalist and a master string instrumentalist, and provide an interesting contrast as an acoustic band. This band has two strong lead singers in Krauss and Dan Tyminski, whose sinewy bluegrass voice dubbed George Clooney's singing in the Coen brothers movie O Brother Where Art Thou? He and Krauss also greatly aided that soundtrack album’s remarkable advancement of bluegrass music into the mainstream. Union Station’s dobro player Jerry Douglas is among the most resourceful and fluent stylists in contemporary music and banjoist-guitarist Ron Block is no front porch picker.
Krauss’ wide-ranging Grammy-studded career speaks volumes for itself -- recently highlighted by her stunning 2009 collaboration with Robert Plant, Raising Sand, which won the Album of the Year Grammy. She’s a rare and exquisite singer and interpreter and an expert bluegrass fiddler whose done as much as anyone in recent memory to bring traditional country and bluegrass to wider audiences.
But we’re comparing groups here. AK & US has a far longer and celebrated track record as a group and they matched TTB in their genre category by snagging the 2012 Grammy for Best Bluegrass Album for Paper Airplane. AK & US brilliantly combines bluegrass, country and folk musics with a contemporaneity that honors and expands those traditions. Comparably, TTB mixes blues, rock, R&B, gospel and jazz into their own meaty stew.
And Union Station’s Jerry Douglas is a truly eclectic innovator whose use of a slide resonator guitar, or dobro, underpins his kaleidoscopic spangled, bluesy style, as does Trucks’ bottleneck slide. Both players draw deeply from jazz as well. Douglas’ usually plays his evocative instrument standing but it hangs from his strap flat up like a lap steel. So few have comparably mastered the dobro that he’s been heard on 1,500 (count ‘em) recordings. He’s a walking one-man soundtrack, with his own load of country and bluegrass Grammies. John Fogerty calls him “my favorite musician.”

(L-R) Jerry Douglas, dobro; Alison Krauss vocals and fiddle, Dan Tyminski vocals and guitar. Photo: AP/Mark Humphrey
Yet neither Krauss nor Douglas in Union Station has the stylistic and expressive range and dynamic power of Tedeschi-Trucks, though admittedly we’re comparing a largely acoustic group to an electric one. And yet, TTB also plays pianissimo superbly.
Tedeschi has commented: “It's amazing when you have two drummers. You can get really super quiet or you that you can get like a freight train is coming, you know (laughs). So I think having that dynamic range was really important was because I think people are really moved by dynamics as well as melody.” 2
Her band also has a strong second lead vocalist, Mike Mattison, the lead singer of Trucks’ band before his wife joined. Mattison has taken a back seat to her; yet Tedeschi is so compelling and dynamically varied that few want to stop listening to her. By contrast, the sweet, angelic purity of Krauss’s soprano, lovely as it is, calls for auditory contrast much sooner, to my tastes.
A CLOSER LOOK AT MUSICAL CHEMISTRY -- Tedeschi and Trucks met in New Orleans when her band opened for the Allman Brothers Band's 1999 Summer Tour. These great individual talents now compound each other. One apparently jealous concertgoer complained that Tedeschi spent too much time focused on Trucks playing onstage rather than playing to the audience. To me this reflects the couple’s intense synchronicity, wrought by their working together as two great musicians, in love. More than just a singer, she’s also a fine blues guitarist who obviously appreciates and feeds off of her husband's instrumental brilliance. Such evident marital chemistry is pretty rare to witness onstage and a key to the heights this group has achieved so swiftly.
All of these elements are vividly evident in the turbo-charged performance of “Space Captain” from the 2010 Crossroads Guitar Festival. Here, sans guitar, Tedeschi is playing to the audience, exhorting them to clap along. As the song builds to its climax with Trucks’ solo, Tedeschi call and response-style interjections push the performance to an extraordinary peak of intensity and, given the “learning to live together” refrain, a kind of white-hot striving for some idealistic pinnacle of human possibility. This You Tube vid -- uploaded on February 3, 2011 -- had an amazing 733,506 hits when I last looked. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Eb_UXDxUbs
Clearly the song that has caught the imagination of YouTube surfers. With Warren Haynes adding the Allmans’ double-lead guitar effect and David Hidalgo and bassist Conrad Lozano of Los Lobos sitting in, not to mention the wailing horns and the double drive of the two drummers --- “Space Captain” soars virtually to the distant utopian planet they're singing about. *
This band has a familial chemistry that, like many marriages, may not last a lifetime, but for now it's incendiary. So you can’t help for rooting for the old marital institution in this case. This union benefits millions more than themselves and their family.
Tedeschi says she and Trucks felt affinity the first day they met: When I heard him play, I was like, "Gosh, he plays kind of like I sing," she recalled to the Arizona Republic recently. “And he thought the same thing. In a lot of ways, when we sit down and play, it's almost like we finish each other's sentences, but musically. We have a really strong connection there. And Derek also has a connection with (bassist) Oteil Burbridge, because he's been playing in the Allman Brothers with him for over a decade. So they have that ESP quality. And then, of course, Oteil has that with his brother, Kofi (the band’s keyboardist/flutist), because they've been brothers their whole lives. And I have it with Falcon (drummer Tyler Greenwell's nickname). Falcon has it with JJ and before you know it, the whole band has ESP between each other. 3
Part of the group’s success is that, for all its instrumental prowess -- all three horn players receive solo spotlights sooner or later -- it does not consider itself a jam band, and their song orientation has helped them reach a larger audience even though in concert their tunes typically stretch to 10 and 15 minutes. But there seems to be a discipline, a self-awareness and sense of form to the groups improvising, led by Trucks’ almost invariably well-structured solos and incisively crucial accompaniment their songs.
Consider a close listen to “Until You Remember.” A mournful brass obbligato opens, gently mocking the prayerful supplication that follows. The song then proceeds unassumingly, the singer beginning to seem self-pitying, rocking between F and D and A-flat and E flat, with the forsaken woman singing almost to herself.
Every night I pray/ that you'll come back today/and hold me like you used to
every night I spent/just waiting on your scent/needing just a trace of you
Then from F comes the falling pedal C sharp major chord which conveys both angst in the chromatic accidental and hope in the major tonality. Tedeschi implores:
I know it ain't refined/but I'll hold your place in line/’til you remember that your mine.
The pedal C sharp tolls over each of these phrases. That harmonic blues descent, combined with Tedeschi’s brave vocal response, is the majestic backbone of the song. Trucks then lashes the chord changes with blood-on-my-fingers guitar, even though it’s a mere few moments, rather than a drawn-out solo.
There song aches with an acknowledgment that, for all the singer’s willful passion, she may wait a long time for the beloved to truly remember “you’re mine.” So “Until You Remember” dwells in painful awareness, moral choices, loss, loneliness and desperate faith -- a devastating distillation of all-too-common human experience.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8RRWQsZN1cc&feature=related
As with most of their originals, poised understatement and emotionally charged climaxes show the group’s artistic maturity.
A recent concert goer named Vuke perhaps over-enthused online about a Sept. 7concert at the Bob Hope Theater in Stockton California: “Derek Trucks was as you'd expect from a lad that grew up with the Allman Brothers Band...as good a guitar player as I've ever seen...(that includes Jimi, Eric, BB, Albert King, Buddy Guy, Muddy Waters, Jimmy Page). I've seen them all and it simply doesn't get any better.”
Part of the effect of his playing is Trucks' electrified finger style plucking and deep-seated harmonic resonances, drawing from Elmore James, as he has noted:
"There was something unleashed in his playing, that acoustic guitar with the electric pickup. When he's singing, you hear his voice through the electric pickup."
James also informs Trucks’ concise choice of notes: Of James' solo in a 1960 version of "Rollin' and Tumblin,'" he commented: "It's real simple, but every note is in the right spot – funky and nasty. Say 'Play that Elmore lick,' and everybody knows what to do." 4
Trucks normally plays that bottleneck in an open E tuning, which allows him a sort of modal and enharmonic freedom, and a sharp chromatic potency. But he can also play with deft finger fretting, often on the slower tunes.
This sophistication reflects the jazz and eastern music influences Trucks brings to the band. I didn’t warm up immediately to Truck’s style but now the slight chill effect of his slide tone sounds slightly akin to John Coltrane’s very tight reed sound, which conveyed an unlikely taciturn melancholy under all his expressionistic flights.
Then there’s the guitar-as-sitar intro to “These Walls” and the raga-like interlude on the live version of “Midnight in Harlem” on Everybody’s Talkin’. The band’s jams on the second disc are often rave ups, like Stevie Wonder’s “Uptight” and the gospel classic “Wade in the Water.” The second disc of the live CD was criticized in a recent Down Beat review for including a certain amount of album “padding.”
Some of these jam moments may feel less than riveting to a home listener, but far more often the cover song arrangements and the solos display consistent wit, fire and imagination, which is more readily appreciated as an in-person experience.
From its searing peak moments to its most genre-stretching jams, this band represents a deep expansive redefinition of the blues.
As both leaders are serious guitarists, the band’s spiritual power may emanate partly from what rock critic-historian Robert Palmer has called The Church of the Sonic Guitar. The electric guitar has captivated generations partly because, as an ancient non-Western music theory goes, the instrument’s myriad untempered and unleashed vibrational overtones come from “a system of ratios or tonal portions that not only exist independently in nature but may underlie reality itself.” 5
The speed with which The Tedeschi Trucks Band has traveled so far in the last year also strongly suggests they may be carrying much of this nation’s very troubled Zeitgeist -- in a more existential way which the music embodies, and transcends, as only great music can. It feels that way also because of how this band -- of multiple racial hues -- recasts America’s native culture which, like so much of our tragic and heroic history, emerges from the South. Yet the real forsaken lives that dwell in the blues today, the struggles of race and class, come from just about everywhere. If this motley-but-inspired crew doesn't speak for the 99%, who does?
The band’s African-American Harvard-educated singer Mike Mattison (who wrote “Midnight in Harlem” and “Bound for Glory” among others) touched on this in the liner notes to Road Songs, the two-record live album that the Derek Trucks Band released shortly before that band’s hiatus, which led to the expanded new band.
“Like any southern band worth his salt, the DTB knows that the blues are the fount of American music itself – and that's how we treat it,” Mattison wrote. “As a Northerner, I've learned that the South is like the blues is like the Derek Trucks Band: Everyone thinks they have it pegged it, but you don't know what it means until you've lived in it a while.” 6
I'm sure Mattison would say as much about the Tedeschi Trucks Band. Does American music gets any better than this today? What do you think?
* “Space Captain,” an old Joe Cocker song, was also Tedeschi and Trucks’ powerful contribution to Herbie Hancock's ambitious international Imagine recording project, which demonstrated a great sense of jazz dialogue amongst the musicians.
This was originally published in the blog Culture Currents (Vernaculars Speak)
1 http://reviews.ticketmaster.com/7171/1567745/tedeschi-trucks-band-r...
2 Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/lists/100-greatest-guitarists-201...
3 http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-derek-trucks-susan-tedeschi-di...
4 http://www.azcentral.com/thingstodo/music/articles/2012/08/27/20120...
5 ibid.
6 Suarez, Ernest "'Already Free,' Trucks Rolls On The Guitar Hero Pays Homage to the.... The Washington Post. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/05/28/AR2....
7 Rock 'n Roll: An Unruly History, Robert Palmer, Harmony Books, 1995, 195
8 liner notes by Mike Mattison, Roadsongs, The Derek Trucks Band, Sony Masterworks CD, 2010

 

Peach Master



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  posted on 9/24/2012 at 08:18 PM
I really like Hot Tuna with Barry Mitterhoff myself. But maybe that's part of why Baskkin Robbins has 31 flavors...

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 9/24/2012 at 10:47 PM
It might be obvious but how about the ABB.

Mule!

My buddy would say Pearl Jam, Rob. He has seen 100+ shows. They jam out, different setlist every night and sometimes will play for hour upon hour. Great band that evolved far beyond the grunge thing.

 

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World Class Peach



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  posted on 9/25/2012 at 05:24 AM
A pal of mine took me to see Pearl Jam a few years back, after I had lost track of their releases. Surprised me how great they were.

I'll take TTB or Wilco.

 

True Peach



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  posted on 9/25/2012 at 07:14 AM
Too subjective to call any band "the best". TTB is a damn fine band, though. Even if they don't fall within the confines of your personal tastes, I don't see how you could argue otherwise.

 

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Universal Peach



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  posted on 9/25/2012 at 05:12 PM
"A pal of mine took me to see Pearl Jam a few years back, after I had lost track of their releases. Surprised me how great they were."

Change "a pal" to "my brother" and that's just about exactly how I felt on Saturday. I didn't expect them to suck--I like a lot of their songs and had always heard they were a great live band. I just didn't expect them to be THAT good, and I didn't expect Gossard and McCready to measure up so favorably with Derek, Warren and the other guitarists I love. Make no mistake, those guys can PLAY, and could hold their own with any of the ABB family guitarists.

"Great band that evolved far beyond the grunge thing."

Well said, CanadianMule. I always thought Pearl Jam was the best band in that scene, and if anything they have only gotten better over time. Others may disagree, but they are SO much better than Nirvana, to pick the obvious comparison. I feel confident their music will stand the test of time far better than Cobain and company will.


 
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