Don't click or your IP will be banned


Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band Forum
You are not logged in

< Last Thread   Next Thread >Ascending sortDescending sorting  
Author: Subject: Jerry's Guitars by Era

Maximum Peach





Posts: 8943
(8961 all sites)
Registered: 12/12/2007
Status: Offline

  posted on 12/16/2012 at 02:17 PM
In listening a lot to the Dead recently,I was interested n how others think Jerry's guitar's influenced the different sounds in different eras.

I'm particularly interested in 68-77.

Noticing the SG on the cover of our just arrived Fillmore West 1969 3 cd set,I was intrigued by the impact of that guitar on the sound of Jerry's leads during that period of time.

This got me thinking about the white Strat,and some of his other choices during each era....

and did the keyboard player of the particular time,and Phil's choice of bass further influence the guitars Jerry chose between 68-74?

Looking forward to some thoughts....

 
Replies:

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4618
(4686 all sites)
Registered: 4/13/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 12/16/2012 at 02:59 PM
I really like 68 - 72....68 -71 is when he was using the SG and then in 72 I think he went to the white strat...His sound is big on Live dead and Roses & Skull...humbuckers...Then he started going to the more fender type sound in 72. I love Europe 72 and it sounds like the a strat at that point

 

____________________
Believin' is alright just don't believe in the wrong thing....Sonny Boy Williamson

 
E-Mail User

World Class Peach



Karma:
Posts: 5148
(5147 all sites)
Registered: 3/28/2008
Status: Offline

  posted on 12/16/2012 at 07:58 PM
Pretty good illustration at this site, although I don't think the "why" is answered

http://dozin.com/jers/guitars.html

 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1230
(1230 all sites)
Registered: 4/16/2007
Status: Offline

  posted on 12/16/2012 at 10:24 PM
They were always upgrading the sound. I can only speak for after 73. But the sound was much different then. Ditto the Allman Brothers with Lamar and Chuck. By the time I saw them in the 90's, the sound was space age compared to the 1973 version. I think Jerry picked his axes because he could get the sound he was looking for at that time.
 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1230
(1230 all sites)
Registered: 4/16/2007
Status: Offline

  posted on 12/16/2012 at 10:58 PM
http://www.epicdimensions.com/gdroadie.html

http://www.epicdimensions.com/gdgear2.html

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 9673
(9698 all sites)
Registered: 4/27/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 12/16/2012 at 11:47 PM
quote:
1975
Jerry, "I don't like any guitars that are available. I'm trying to have a guitar built."



 

Sublime Peach



Karma:
Posts: 7896
(7896 all sites)
Registered: 7/18/2010
Status: Offline

  posted on 12/17/2012 at 05:56 PM
where is jerry's guitar these days?
 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 46798
(46799 all sites)
Registered: 7/8/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 12/17/2012 at 06:09 PM
quote:
where is jerry's guitar these days?


The fate of some of his guitars was a real mess after he passed. He willed the Irwin guitars (Wolf, Tiger, Rosebud) to go back to Doug Irwin, but GD management fought pretty bitterly over giving them to him. He had been in a serious car accident and wanted them back to auction them because he needed the money. He did get Wolf and Tiger back and sold them. Rosebud, the Travis Bean and others are in the RRHOF. Tiger is owned by Jim Irsay, owner of the Indianapolis Colts.

 

Peach Master



Karma:
Posts: 791
(791 all sites)
Registered: 5/19/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 12/18/2012 at 08:41 AM
quote:
where is jerry's guitar these days?


someone has it in san fran...

quote:
Chris Robinson Brotherhood played their second of four shows at San Francisco, CA’s Great American Music Hall last night. As a nod to the area, Brotherhood—and former Ryan Adams & the Cardinals guitarist Neal Casal—performed on Jerry Garcia’s famed Wolf guitar during the night


http://www.jambands.com/news/2012/12/13/neal-casal-plays-garcia-s-wolf-guitar-with-chris-robinson-brotherhood[/url]/

 

____________________

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 9673
(9698 all sites)
Registered: 4/27/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 12/19/2012 at 10:28 AM
I came across some articles and interviews last night. Some quotes here and you may want to read the articles although most are more about playing style, philosophy rather than the guitars themselves.

1978 Guitar Player magazine
http://www.guitarplayer.com/article/GP-Flashback--Jerry-Garcia-October-1978 /71


Excerpts below are from here:
http://www.deadhookforums.com/archive/index.php/t-17932.html

quote:

What’s your take on tone?

First, it’s important to have a concept of good tone—no matter what it is. And then the rest is just finding it. My concept of good tone is a clear, unambiguous sound on each note. For me, that means relatively high frets, relatively heavy strings, and a thick pick, so your touch is coming from the hand and not the pick. The rest has to do with pickups and speakers. I go for a slightly higher action because I like a clear note. But if you set the action too high, you’re out of tune.

What gauge strings do you use?

I use a custom Vinci set, gauged .010, .013, .017, .027, .037, and .047.

Describe your technique.

Most guitarists use kind of a flat fingering, but I’ve somehow trained myself to come straight down on top of the string. I play mostly on the tips of my fingers, so a high action doesn’t get in the way at all. I’m not pulling other strings down along with the note. Generally, I like to pick every note, but I do tend to use pull-offs—almost without thinking about it. I almost never pull off one note, but I will use pull-offs on, say, real fast triplets. I seldom play hammer-ons, because they seem to have a certain inexactitude. My preference is for the well-spoken tone, and I think coming straight down on the string with high knuckles makes that happen. My little groups of pull-offs are really well articulated. That’s something I worked on a lot.

I have four or five different families of vibrato. Some are unsupported—nothing is touching the guitar but my finger on the string. Other methods are supported, and I just move the finger for the sound. Sometimes I also use wrist motion, and, other times, I’ll move my whole arm. I also use horizontal and lateral motion for different speeds. Each has its own sound, and it depends on where I’m going, and which finger I’m leading with. If you start with a bit of vibrato before you actually pick the note, you get a softer onset, and that can be lovely. I tend to be style conscious in terms of wanting a song to sound like the world it comes from. For example, playing the blues, it’s generally appropriate to use a slow vibrato.

Does the shape and thickness of the flatpick play a role in your sound?

It makes a big difference. A lot of it has to do with how hard you squeeze that sucker. If you pinch the pick harder, you’ll get a duller sound out of the strings. If you hold it more loosely, you’ll get a more open, boingier tone. I use a pick that has zero flexibility. I don’t want the pick to bend, spring back, or do anything I'm not controlling. I favor real heavy picks, but if a pick is too heavy, it mutes the string. Some materials work better than others.

I use a Fender Extra Heavy flatpick that I sometimes palm when plucking with my fingers. I don’t hold the pick in the standard way, but more like you hold a pencil. Howard Roberts describes this as the scalpel technique. The motion is generated from the thumb and index finger rather than the wrist or elbow. But I use all kinds of motion, depending on whether I’m playing single-string lines or chords.



quote:
Jerry's Kids

Garcia began playing “Wolf”—his first custom guitar built by Doug Irwin—in 1972. To maintain a constant signal level to his effects pedals, Garcia developed an innovative onboard effects loop. The pickups’ buffered, pre-volume-control signal first went to his pedals, and the effected signal then returned to the guitar. Garcia used the guitar’s volume knob to control his post-effects signal, which finally went to his amp. An onboard switch let him bypass the effects loop.

A sister to Garcia’s famous “Tiger” (shown on cover), the Irwin-built “Rosebud” became Garcia’s primary Dead guitar around 1990. At 11.5 lbs, Rosebud weighs two lbs less than Tiger. Garcia played both Rosebud and Tiger in his final Grateful Dead performance on July 9, 1995, in Chicago.

Graham Nash gave Garcia this ’57 Strat—ultimately known as “Alligator”—which played a starring role in the Dead’s Europe ’72. In addition to its custom tailpiece and bridge, the guitar likely housed an early Alembic buffer/preamp.



Excerpt below from:
ftp://gdead.berkeley.edu/pub/gdead/interviews/Musician.article.1981


quote:
ADDENDUM #3

The Dead's Equipment

The Dead have gone through enough equipment during the past decade
and a half to outfit a small musical army. Guitarist Garcia started
his recording career with a Guild Starfire, then switched to Gibson
(a '57 Les Paul and '60 SG) for _Anthem of The Sun_. But by
_Workingman's Dead_ he'd changed again, this time opting for a
Stratocaster. "I decided that Strat sound was what I was really
looking for, so I played standard models for a while, and then in '73
settled in with a couple of custom models designed for me by Doug
Irwin. It's a basic Strat set-up, with three DiMarzio Dual Sound
Pickups that allow me to still get that Gibson sound if I need it,
though I generally prefer the Fender tone." Garcia uses Vinci strings
and Fender Twin Reverb Amps for both concert and studio
performances. Effects include a Mutron Octave Divider by Mutronics,
and MXR Distortion Plus, Phaser, and Analog Delay units.


I'd bet there are old guitar magazine interviews that would speak to Jerry's guitar choice and sound out there to be found.

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 8943
(8961 all sites)
Registered: 12/12/2007
Status: Offline

  posted on 12/19/2012 at 09:55 PM
Thanks,Nebish.....pretty interesting stuff...thanks...greatly appreciated....

Any SG's in the collection? I didn't notice any in the pictures.

Guess I should check the Fillmore 69 pics...I could be wrong,but I thought I saw an SG?

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 9673
(9698 all sites)
Registered: 4/27/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 12/19/2012 at 10:37 PM
These pictures came from a link off the link that stormyrider posted


This one says 1969, played on Live Dead


This one says May 1970

http://dozin.com/jers/guitar/history.htm

 

World Class Peach



Karma:
Posts: 5148
(5147 all sites)
Registered: 3/28/2008
Status: Offline

  posted on 12/20/2012 at 10:04 PM
quote:
I came across some articles and interviews last night. Some quotes here and you may want to read the articles although most are more about playing style, philosophy rather than the guitars themselves.

1978 Guitar Player magazine
http://www.guitarplayer.com/article/GP-Flashback--Jerry-Garcia-October-1978 /71




great read, thanks

 

Peach Master



Karma:
Posts: 864
(864 all sites)
Registered: 10/30/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 12/27/2012 at 02:03 PM
I have seen pictures of Jerry playing a 50s Custom LP and 56 or older gold top. So it is tough to pin down what he used. It seemed Jerry changed guitars a lot until he went to the Irwin guitars.
 
 


Powered by XForum 1.81.1 by Trollix Software

Privacy | Terms of Service | Report Infringement | Personal Data Management | Contact Us
The ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND name, The ALLMAN BROTHERS name, likenesses, logos, mushroom design and peach truck are all registered trademarks of THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. whose rights are specifically reserved. Any artwork, visual, or audio representations used on this web site CONTAINING ANY REGISTERED TRADEMARKS are under license from The ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. A REVOCABLE, GRATIS LICENSE IS GRANTED TO ALL REGISTERED PEACH CORP MEMBERS FOR The DOWNLOADING OF ONE COPY FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. ANY DISTRIBUTION OR REPRODUCTION OF THE TRADEMARKS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE PROHIBITED AND ARE SPECIFICALLY RESERVED BY THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO.,INC.
site by Hittin' the Web Group with www.experiencewasabi3d.com