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Author: Subject: new DLR interview does not look good for VH

World Class Peach





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  posted on 2/12/2013 at 10:38 PM
Wow, well, I am kind of shocked by a lot of this. It sure makes me think we will not be getting much more VH with DLR, and that is a bummer.

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/q-a-david-lee-roth-vents-about-van-h alens-future-20130212

By Steve Baltin
February 12, 2013 1:55 PM ET
David Lee Roth is unquestionably one of the most colorful and dynamic frontmen in the history of rock music – and that extends to his epic interviews as well. Diamond Dave may not say much these days, but when he decides to open up, very little is off limits.

Last week Roth, who is doing a new Internet radio show called The Roth Show and was involved in the White Noise remix of the Van Halen smash "Jump," opened up in a big way to Rolling Stone. Speaking by phone for over an hour from his new home in Tokyo, Roth spoke about a musical he recently wrote with Marilyn Manson and Rob Zombie guitarist John 5, his interest in remixing classic songs as "floor" (the term he coined for dance music) and, of course, Van Halen.

The frontman expressed a lot of frustration at lack of movement within the band, both in writing new material and expanded touring. "I’m not sure what’s in Ed’s mind at this point," Roth says of guitarist Eddie Van Halen. "Truth be told, Edward and I haven’t written a new song in 20 years." He also expressed interest in taking Van Halen to festivals like Coachella and Lollapalooza – provided, of course, that the rest of the band agrees. Adds Roth, "There’s nothing on the ticket as far as [touring past this summer], and that’s a disappointment, frankly." Read on for more from our exclusive Q&A.

What brought you to Tokyo?

A lifetime of growing up next to a Japanese neighborhood. First time I held a Japanese sword in my hand, I think I was nine years old, 10 years old. Here now I train four times a week with a fellow who's a professional instructor and I go to school every day of the week – I'm in school two and four hours variously in Japanese. I've never had an issue with changing my geography, perhaps to jolt my mind or my creative forces, or my fighting spirit. The first three months were challenging, I'm not gonna kid you. I came by myself and without knowing the language or anybody here, and cut to today, we have the Tokyo Dome show coming up, the Van Halen brothers and I, and I have more guests here than I had at Madison Square Garden. We sold out the Garden twice last February. I have close to 200 friends and family, all of them I know by first name, coming to each of the shows, so it's exploded. And creatively it has had a really resounding impact on me. I have an apartment and I've been here since last May, actually – wow. I love the United States. I have not given up my New York City apartment or my tomb with a view in Pasadena – I understand the sprinklers are all working perfectly. But I don't have any real plans anytime soon, until it's time to talk about The Roth Show, which, again, is an international flavor. We launched that about four months ago, but I broadcast from here and, the miracle of everything, we shoot the show here and wherever I go. And I'll be heading to New York, I'll do a month there.


 
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World Class Peach



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  posted on 2/12/2013 at 10:39 PM
Let's talk about the creative influence being there has had on you.

It's across the board. Here you can't join a specific neighborhood. In the United States you can put on a cowboy hat and join the country-western neighborhood. If you're down below 14th Street in New York City, that's bohemian, that's left-wing. I was just speaking to my Uncle Manny, God bless him – he's 93 years old – and we were discussing some of the controversy involving our remix of the song "Jump," and he laughed and said, "You're kidding. Bob Dylan just picked up an electric guitar." You can't have neighborhoods like that here. There's no one particular neighborhood. I shared with Al Van Halen, who I speak with every morning here, "I understand there's some controversy following the remix idea," which indeed was Alex's. Alex had heard Elton John had taken his greatest hits and had it remixed and turned into "floor," I call it. [People] get confused between disco, house, trance and rave, so I call it floor.

I said to Al, "I heard of some fellows named White Noise out of San Francisco." I subscribe to Beatport, where all the DJs of the world do file sharing and look over each other's shoulders in 82 languages. And they did a smashing version of "Jump." This is not a new idea. I'm not gonna say I did this first. There are four different versions of "Jump" that are floor that are easily as good, if not better, but this one is the most modern. So we got something that is well in line with our attitude, our core of larcenous sense of humor and let's-take-a-left-hand-turn-now-and-then. We've had great success with it already. Alex and I were laughing that anybody cares at all, much less there's a rallying cry or whatever. You just don't change the smile on the Mona Lisa? Well, the **** you don't.

So will there be more Van Halen remixes?


I spoke to Al earlier and I said, "We gotta license this so we can get it up on Beatport. We can put it on iTunes and reach that audience." In some senses of the word any controversy that follows Van Halen is akin to asking the country-western crowd, "What do you think of old Michael Jackson?" And then being surprised at the reaction. We have a core audience who is devout, just as any religion or political faction or any kind of long-term rock group has, but we have the capacity to play and to revise and have a whole lot of celebrative fun with a lot of other neighborhoods as opposed to just the lead, bass and drum gang. The brothers and I have a considerable amount of classic music training. When we write songs they almost demand revision and interpretation, as does any great material. I was always loving it when Aztec Camera would take a shot at something that we do or any of the aforementioned.

How will this experimental energy manifest in possible new Van Halen material?

I would certainly look forward to working with Ed on some new material, but we have yet to do that. Almost all of the music that you hear on our most recent album was written and demoed before the first album. And I would certainly look forward to writing a whole list of songs with Ed, but we haven't found the time to do that [laughs]. You hear the tone. I'm not sure what's in Ed's mind at this point. I'm gonna guess that his plans are to write with his son, and I'm not sure where that actually leads. But truth be told, Edward and I haven't written a new song in 20 years.

The Tokyo dates are coming up. Will there be more after that?

There's nothing on the ticket as far as travel, and that's a disappointment, frankly. How long have I been back with the gang? Maybe six years, we'll say and we have yet to travel to Europe, South America, Japan, anywhere outside of those basic 50 cities in the United States. And again that's been a disappointment. We have an audience and we have a potential future in many, many places, but our story is one of a whole lotta Shakespeare going on. And I don't know where the Van Halen future lies aside from the States. We'll always be able to play our hits – and keep in mind we have more hits than Beethoven, we have more hits than Tony Soprano – so getting onstage and playing that is glorious, and certainly getting onstage with the brothers will always be an excitement for me. But in terms of taking the music past where we found it, I'm not sure where that's going to go.

 

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  posted on 2/12/2013 at 10:41 PM
And in the interim I've written and recorded an entire album of material with a fellow named John 5. It's called Somewhere Over the Rainbow Bar & Grill, and it was designed as a jukebox musical after seeing what the South Park fellows did. Those fellows are ardent Van Halen fans – they're been to Vegas and L.A. variously on the last tour. I saw the play [Book Of Mormon] and went home and we started putting together what I guess is called a jukebox musical, but it's not particular to Van Halen. Indeed we can create Van Halen material as the interstitials, but we have 15 songs ready to go, and it's my story. Indiana kid goes to the big city, sells his soul to the devil. Whatever Lola wants, Lola gets Dave. It's knockout stuff.

The "Jump" remix is part of an approach I wanted to take of, "What if we take a specific song and update it both in terms of time period and neighborhood, and you use that throughout the play?" The way "Jump" sounds originally is very different than the way it sounds on this latest version. You can turn it country, you can make it a very sad song. I was also thinking to take this material to one of our finer filmmakers and see if the whole package might be used. That being said, it's not heavy metal, and no, it's not dance music. It's R&B-based, a lot of B3 [organ] and a lot of girl-friendly . . . It's rock, but think early Rod Stewart, perhaps, arguably the best years, [or] "Tumbling Dice" if you're thinking in terms of classic. So who knows where that's gonna go.


But Ed has his own vision, I'm assuming. We haven't really been able to speak about it and it's a disappointment, just as not having a chance for a reunion of the original band. Clearly, vocals are every bit as much a component of success as a rhythm section or a guitar solo, and there's an old expression saying, "They don't go home singing the lighting show, they don't go home singing the production." You're right, they sing my words and my melodies. And what we have at our fingertips is arguably one of the greatest high tenor voices ever – that was in Michael Anthony. In our tiny little corner of the universe, that voice is as identifiable as the high voice in Earth, Wind & Fire, as identifiable as the high voice in the Beach Boys. Van Halen is an indelicate house blend of both – that's intentionally. So I would always look forward to that reunion, and I would always look forward to writing a whole variety of material. I've offered the fellows, come on out here to the land of the gods. And if you don't want to make it that far we'll make it halfway – Konishiki [his friend and former champion sumo wrestler] has said he'll lend me his house in Hawaii, Let's go woodshed. But so far there hasn't been any response, so hope and faith are not actual tactics and strategies – they're strippers from Albuquerque.

Let's focus on the positive first. Would you want to take those 15 songs with John to the stage?


Absolutely. That's what it's aimed at. It's autobiographic. "Somewhere Over the Rainbow Bar & Grill" is the opening theme song, and it's about an Indiana kid who goes to sleep – think The Wizard Of Oz – and the characters in his life, the butcher, the baker and the newspaper guy, pop out of posters and sing him a song called "Giddyup." And he finds his way to all the good things in life, having discovered rock in the Sixties, and there's a song titled "Alligator Pants" – yes, I own a pair, I wore them for the last two tours. And things go horribly left-of-center wrong, of course, when you sell your soul to the devil, and one of the tunes is called "The **** That Killed Elvis." So yeah, it's pretty stellar material. Again, I've offered it up to the Van Halens, but I seriously doubt there are going to be any takers there. As I've said, we haven't written a new song since I left in 1984. Almost everything on that record [A Different Kind of Truth] is from before we recorded the first album or out or about somewhere in that time frame. Wait, what am I saying? "Stay Frosty" is brand new, and I wrote that whole song myself. I wrote the chord structure, played the guitar, the vocals, etc. Therein that was remanded to the back side – well, it's not a record anymore, side B, next to the last of whatever. It's an update, thinking symmetrically – "Ice Cream Man," "Stay Frosty," I get it [laughs].

You clearly have a lot you want to do individually. Where will this go for you?

Well, I was just on the phone yesterday with John, and we're now beginning to explore what that means. It's been a year since our last tour with Van Halen. There's virtually no impact or contact in terms of writing new material, and given that I don't have the opportunity to work with original material I invented a whole new website show, Tokyo Hi-Power Style and all the music you hear there is my personal collection. That's all floor, and it's kind of talk radio but with that kind of a musical background, and half of it is in Japanese.



 

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  posted on 2/12/2013 at 10:43 PM
That's heavy lifting, conducting recording sessions completely in Japanese. So I'm pursuing with a vengeance. I went to the Sumo tournament with Konishiki as my teacher, and we went not only to the tournament, but we went to the beya, which is the gym. And we had what in music is called an encounter, question and answer, back and forth. And I asked them, "What inspires you? What compels you?" And variously one would say, "I do not want to dishonor my parents." Another said, "I would like to be a great champion." We went around the circle, and one of them said to me, "Dave-san, what inspires you?" I said, "Fear and revenge." They asked, "Revenge against who?" I said, "People who have a whole lot more talent than I do and then threw it away. Sometimes friends of ours have Maserati-style talent and they treat it like a **** ing lawn mower." And they all laughed.

I said, "Then there are folks who have lived much faster and got much farther down the track. Now my wristwatch seems to be moving forward faster and my knees seem to be going slower." Everybody sort of nodded. It's revenge against my wristwatch. And fear that I might not have all the time that I wish I could in order to do what's in my imagination. I don't think what I'm imagining is preposterous. I don't think what I'm imagining is undoable at all. Maybe I'm audacious, but I can't really even smell it. Let's get after this, like Grandma Roth said. I'm furious to beat the clock here. And whether or not I do last to 93, I want to live a life well-lived. And I do it with a sense of humor. I brought up something in an interview with one of the magazines here in Tokyo. I said, "I wish Bon Jovi would've given me a call before he recorded all of his hits, because the lyrics would've been smarter, the melodies would've been much more smashing, and they would've sold a lot fewer records." Fighting spirit, Steve-san. It's a goddamn war every day in the music business in one faction or another. I have a taste for that. I like conflict, and I can admit that now. "Come on, let's get after this. Where's the next war, guys?"

What is there left to accomplish that you still want to do musically?

I don't know that it's so much to accomplish as it is to get with a team or a group, to get with other folks and have an idea and a vision and to be busy all the time. My favorite expression of Andy Warhol's was, "I think to be busy is the best thing in life." And I can heartily agree now and just get on horseback, and if you have to change your direction in momentum, so much better than sitting and thinking about and deciding and not even going. For me, 60 is the new 80. You oughta see my X-rays. So get going, start heading north. And whether we accomplish anything or not becomes beside the point. The goal is to get with somebody and get with a group or team or a squad and get going on something that everybody's contributing to. I believe in that for me, probably for most folks, more than ever. You might be surprised to hear that from somebody – when you say lead singer, you think that's a solitary vision, a self-centric kind of positioning. "How many lead singers does it take to put in a light bulb? One. You're supposed to hold the bulb and let the world revolve around you." As achingly true as that might have been periodically in my life, I can follow just as good as lead. But I do want to be on that boat.

Would you want to work with another group of musicians?

Certainly, absolutely, and we can sit here for another hour and go through the list. It doesn't matter the kind of music, it doesn't matter whether it's a cowboy hat or a yarmulke. I don't care if it's outer space or pop, the spirit is the same. There are only so many letters in the alphabet. When I talk to young musicians or authors and they ask for advice, I say, "You gotta learn all the letters of your own personal alphabet. With music, you need to know all the different kinds of music and everything in and around your given instrument." They say, "Well, why would I want to learn somebody else's alphabet?" "Son, you're not gonna invent any new letters in the alphabet, but if you do learn all of them and you can start creating words with them, well, last I looked, the Bible is written in the identical alphabet as all of my favorite pornography. At least you can make an informed choice." [Laughs] Which way is the porn store?

It will be very interesting to see what happens with all of these merging interests you have. You mentioned Coachella. Would we ever see Van Halen on that type of stage?


Alex and I have been begging to become part of that, and Glastonbury and Reading and Hyde Park. We keep being shuttled into the heavy metal world, and that's a very exclusive neighborhood, but here we are – we're back knocking on the doors begging for Bonnaroo and begging for Lollapalooza and Coachella, not even as an advancement of career, but there's a whole new audience who doesn't know and doesn't give a **** about Van Halen, and that's exactly the best audience to sharpen your spirit on. That will compel you to the very best that you have. I can't wait for those opportunities and wish us well. We've been asking for those shows since I've gotten back with the band six years ago, and I'll be very curious to see where we wind up come next season.


 

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  posted on 2/12/2013 at 10:49 PM
That was on Rolling Stone's website today.

Quite a bit to take in. Dave's praise for Michael Anthony, his digs at Eddie for not using his talent, his notion that Van Halen should perform an album loosely based on Dave's life, his digs at the last album, the idea that he is not in touch with Eddie at all - none of it bodes well.

I have to think that if/when EVH reads this, he will say, "We are done."

 

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  posted on 2/13/2013 at 01:37 AM
That was pretty much the feeling I got when they were still on tour. DLR was having a hard time vocally and his timing was all over the map. As if he didn't remember the tunes and that was well into the tour. Then shows got cancelled from lack of sales. I know that some disagreed or doubted what I said but I posted to wait and see. EVH does not respect Dave and VH used him and he used them.

Dave talking reunion with Michael is proof at how out there he is. He sees the writing on the wall and did right when things started to cancel. Smart guy who knows the business and knows full well that EVH will not get rid of his son. EVH does not have to read this to say it's done. He was always on that path.

 

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  posted on 2/13/2013 at 08:24 AM
Dave is always an entertaining interview. Always alot to say. Interesting to hear him say how much Al is into this remix stuff and some other ideas. I am not sure what Ed thinks of that.

Here is a link to the Jump remix
http://ultimateclassicrock.com/david-lee-roth-posts-new-remix-for-van-halen s-jump/

 

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  posted on 2/13/2013 at 08:42 AM
There is never peace in the VH camp.

Roth is always an entertaining interview, but the past few years he's pretty much had a gag order on him to not say anything, so I'm sure that's driven him crazy.


 

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  posted on 2/13/2013 at 12:17 PM
I agree with CanadianMule's comments. The fact DLR is even doing an interview with a major US outlet such as Rolling Stone leads me to believe that DLR already views it as more or less over. Knowingly violating the gag order? Mentioning Mike Anthony really isn't any farther out there than doing the interview anyway. At least now he directs the blame more on the Brothers or EVH alone for that. Which we all already knew. But now at least he's making it clear he would prefer (and would have preferred) to go out as the original band. And kudos to DLR for giving M.A. some props anyway.

Interesting thing about him saying they haven't written anything new in nearly 30 years. We know ADKOT is mostly the pre-VH1 demos, re-worked a little bit, but I thought there was something more than Stay Frosty that was new. In any event, I guess he means released. They worked on new stuff in 2000-2001. While they had done She's The Woman and Tattoo back then too, apparently they worked up a tune with DLR's lyrics/vox/melody that eventually became Up For Breakfast with Hagar on the BOBW greatest hits package in 2004.

 

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  posted on 2/13/2013 at 12:18 PM
They also did Me Wise Magic and Can't Get This Stuff No More in 1996. Hagar got paid out for using his melody for the latter, but I presume the lyrics were at least DLR's.

 

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  posted on 2/13/2013 at 12:23 PM
My first thought was, well, it's Rolling Stone magazine

then, well, it's David Lee Roth

now, it's just, damn, I couldn't believe a new album was being released at all
and that I still enjoy it a year later

If this is the last hurrah, which for some reason i am doubting, then either way
it was pretty cool, even though live, Roth's voice was pretty shot

 

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  posted on 2/13/2013 at 01:43 PM
quote:
They also did Me Wise Magic and Can't Get This Stuff No More in 1996. Hagar got paid out for using his melody for the latter, but I presume the lyrics were at least DLR's.


both songs were left over from other sessions, at least the music. hell the 3 new tunes on BOBW were musically leftovers from other sessions. looks like EVH hasn't written new music for a van halen sing in about 13 years if not longer

 

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  posted on 2/13/2013 at 02:25 PM
I don't doubt those two could have been leftover from Balance, or from writing for the follow-up to Balance. Hagar even said after his first firing (1996-ish) that they had already worked up a few new tunes for the follow-up to Balance, and one of them was to be their "Stairway to Heaven" (Hagar always comparing VH to Zeppelin). And that they had worked up what became Can't Get This Stuff No More prior to his firing and that's why he had a claim to writing the melody on that one. But whatever the case, they were new songs as in post-1984, so that goes against DLR's comments in the new interview. And "As Is" and "You and Yer Blues" were not from the pre-VH1 demos, so those are "new" tunes too. Who knows how new...could very well be from the 2000-2001 sessions or from the follow-up to VH3 in 1999.

Plus, I think EVH was still writing up until 2000-ish. Perhaps not prolifically, but he was writing. Almost all (if not all) of VH3 was written new in the late 1990s, and they were half-way done with the follow-up to that one before Warner Bros. nixed Cherone. That being said, they always recycled songs from those original demos as late as 1984. But I think his lack of songwriting really corresponds from his incapacitation from alcohol after everything fell apart in 2000-2001.

 

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  posted on 2/13/2013 at 04:59 PM
Dave just rambles so you can't really hold him to exact details and dates. Also some of the redone stuff may not have been written by him.

As Zambi mentioned, doing the interview and saying this stuff would draw an end even if it wasn't already in play.

As for Al saying that he liked this remix stuff, that is likely just him saying "Sure Dave". He has long been the middle guy and done most of the "dirty" work in the VH camp.

For me, it was great to just hear the old stuff again and I was pleasantly suprised at how well EVH played. If not with Dave then I hope they get it going with someone. Find some young guy who can sing the stuff and hit the road.

 

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  posted on 2/13/2013 at 05:00 PM
Hard to get worked up over this....is anyone really surprised ?

 

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  posted on 2/13/2013 at 09:07 PM
While I am neither stunned nor distraught, I am indeed disappointed. That album was a strong one, stronger than expected, even if it was a lot of recycled old stuff. The video clips I saw showed Eddie and his son playing very, very well and having a ball. The abrupt end to the touring and then the sudden silence did not bode well, but I was still surprised by much of the interview.

And I do think it is sad. This is one of the best American bands, with one of the best guitarists around. It is a shame if they do not keep making music. Dave solo has some moments but is nowhere near as good.

 

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  posted on 2/14/2013 at 07:31 AM
quote:
While I am neither stunned nor distraught, I am indeed disappointed. That album was a strong one, stronger than expected, even if it was a lot of recycled old stuff. The video clips I saw showed Eddie and his son playing very, very well and having a ball. The abrupt end to the touring and then the sudden silence did not bode well, but I was still surprised by much of the interview.

And I do think it is sad. This is one of the best American bands, with one of the best guitarists around. It is a shame if they do not keep making music. Dave solo has some moments but is nowhere near as good.



Well said, I agree.Just disappointed. Was hoping to hear more, but if this is the final effort I am good with it. We hate see our fav's hang it up , but it happens. Just have to resign to that fact like with Zep. I was hoping and waiting for years for that band to fly again cause I am such a huge fan of them and Page is my fav guitar player, but after hearing Celebration Day, I would rather not. Not that it was bad by any means, but I have discussed my feelings about that before.

Anyways back to VH....

I still question why go through all of this effort and work to bring the VH product out and then supposedly dump it? If Dave was/is the problem, they would have know that going in. And from the interview it sounds like he and Al talk quite abit and are on the same page. Suprises me a little seeing that their might be some allegiance with Ed as far as the direction of the band.

Nice to hear Dave give Mike Anthony a little shout out and pat on the back. Well deserved I must say.

 

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  posted on 2/14/2013 at 08:20 AM
I think this interview is typical David Lee Roth hyperbole publicity/marketing. As Dave himself likes to say "always keep 'em guessing." There's no such thing as bad publicity after all. Especially a few months before you're about to fire up the Van Halen money spicket.
 

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  posted on 2/14/2013 at 01:29 PM
the reason there aren't any futere shows may be his left hand is still bothering him from surgery in 2009
http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/exclusive-eddie-van-halen-recovering -after-hand-surgery-20090723


or maybe his colon surgery?
http://www.classicrockmagazine.com/news/eddie-van-halen-in-emergency-colon- surgery/







 

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  posted on 2/14/2013 at 02:08 PM
At this point I don't even care anymore. They came out with a solid studio album and I thought they were very good live for a while until Roth started back sliding into his old habits of talking and yelling out the lyrics or mumbling incoherent words into the lyrics instead of the real words. He could get away with it back in the day because he had that rock star body and long hair and those unique screetches and screams. Now he is unable to reach the high notes and do those screetches and screams, he doesn't have the pumped body and long hair, and he has replaced the high jumps, splits, and running around with thar silly slide board at the front of the stage which at least for me got very cheesy and old very quickly. The old vintage VH is long gone now and will never return and unless Roth gets back to more of what he was doing at the very beginning of them reforming and singing the songs the way they should be sung and stopping all of the sliding and spinning on that stupid slide board they are gonna be what they are which to me is three incredible musicians on stage with a has been hack who needs to act like a clown because his ego the size of Texas has returned. That is my take. I liked the new record and I thought they were pretty good live when they first started but it was only a matter of time before the Roth ego thing re emerged. Just listen to how Roth screams 'pay my bills' in 'Hear About It Later' live and it is like a three year old kid screaming for a glass of milk or something and those kinds of things that he constantly does just ruins the music for me. If they are gonna move forward as a band and want to write new music I hope they boot Roth and get some young stud who can not only sing the vintage VH stuff properly but can also fit in with the three VH boys and create some new top quality music. I don't see that happening with Roth seeing that the last album was made up of old demos.

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 2/14/2013 at 02:13 PM
and now the Van Halen News Desk breaks it down:


http://www.vhnd.com/2013/02/14/dissecting-david-lee-roths-rolling-stone-int erview/


 

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Maximum Peach



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  posted on 2/14/2013 at 09:35 PM
quote:
At this point I don't even care anymore. They came out with a solid studio album and I thought they were very good live for a while until Roth started back sliding into his old habits of talking and yelling out the lyrics or mumbling incoherent words into the lyrics instead of the real words. He could get away with it back in the day because he had that rock star body and long hair and those unique screetches and screams. Now he is unable to reach the high notes and do those screetches and screams, he doesn't have the pumped body and long hair, and he has replaced the high jumps, splits, and running around with thar silly slide board at the front of the stage which at least for me got very cheesy and old very quickly. The old vintage VH is long gone now and will never return and unless Roth gets back to more of what he was doing at the very beginning of them reforming and singing the songs the way they should be sung and stopping all of the sliding and spinning on that stupid slide board they are gonna be what they are which to me is three incredible musicians on stage with a has been hack who needs to act like a clown because his ego the size of Texas has returned. That is my take. I liked the new record and I thought they were pretty good live when they first started but it was only a matter of time before the Roth ego thing re emerged. Just listen to how Roth screams 'pay my bills' in 'Hear About It Later' live and it is like a three year old kid screaming for a glass of milk or something and those kinds of things that he constantly does just ruins the music for me. If they are gonna move forward as a band and want to write new music I hope they boot Roth and get some young stud who can not only sing the vintage VH stuff properly but can also fit in with the three VH boys and create some new top quality music. I don't see that happening with Roth seeing that the last album was made up of old demos.


Dave has been Dave for the last 30 plus years from the inception of VH so I am not sure what people are expecting differently from him. I scratch my head when people make comments like that.It's not any different from what he has been doing from day one. Yeah he is not 20 some years old anymore, maybe not quite as agile. but it's still Dave. Dave was never a great singer to begin with but he gets the job done and serves the music they have made.Yeah maybe his vocals are not quite there, but was it really ever? Does Ian Gillan sound like he did in 1972?

No I did not see them on the they're last tour , but I watched many perfromances online. He seems like his stage act and his style is pretty much the same, except for what the aging processs has done to it.

VH US Festival
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gayoRt2qjuY

 

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True Peach



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  posted on 2/15/2013 at 01:48 AM
That vintage video which I have on DVD makes my argument for me. Dave's old stage persona is what made people not care about his so so vocals along with those unique high pitched screams. IMO he no longer has either the stage presence or the high pitched screams that were so unique.

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 2/15/2013 at 08:34 AM
I'd still go to see Eddie rip it up

 

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Universal Peach



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  posted on 2/15/2013 at 09:17 AM
quote:
I'd still go to see Eddie rip it up




So would I if they weren't so damn loud for my older ears....And played outside gigs. The indoor arena thing is no longer my cup of tea. But I damn well would love to hear Ed, Al, and now Wolf tear it up one last time.

 
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