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Author: Subject: Romney: Trump promoting trickle down racism

True Peach





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  posted on 6/10/2016 at 06:15 PM

The Latest: Romney worries Trump is promoting racism
The Associated Press
17 minutes ago
WASHINGTON --
The Latest on campaign 2016 (all times Eastern):
6:45 p.m.
Mitt Romney says he worries that Donald Trump is promoting "trickle-down racism" and appealing to the racist tendencies of some Americans.
Romney, the 2012 Republican presidential nominee, says he will consider voting for the Libertarian candidate, Gary Johnson. Romney made the remarks in a CNN interview while hosting his annual politics and business summit at a ski resort near Park City, Utah.
Romney has been one of the most outspoken Republican Trump critics and continued hammering the presumptive nominee on CNN.
Of the billionaire businessman's taxes, which Trump has refused to release, Romney says, "there's something in those taxes that's even worse than shooting someone on Fifth Avenue."
A spokesman for Trump says on CNN that Romney's comments amount to "sour grapes."
__
4:30 p.m.
Donald Trump told a gathering of evangelical Christians on Friday that "no one should be judged by their race or their color."
Trump has been under fire for suggesting that the judge hearing a case against his now-defunct Trump University is biased against him because the judge's parents were born in Mexico.
Trump has proposed building a wall along the southern border and deporting everyone living in the country illegally.
He has refused to apologize for his remarks about the judge. He issued a statement earlier this week saying his comments had been "misconstrued."
He said Friday the United States is deeply divided and vowed he'd "bring our nation together."
__
2:10 p.m.
Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton is expected to receive an endorsement from the AFL-CIO, the nation's largest labor federation.
It's the latest sign of Democrats shifting toward the general election against Republican Donald Trump.
A union official said the AFL-CIO's political committee voted Friday to recommend that the labor federation's general board hold a conference call next week Thursday to consider the endorsement.
Clinton is all but assured of it, because she has received most of the endorsements of the AFL-CIO's member unions.
The official spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the private meeting.
___
1:35 p.m.
Donald Trump has been interrupted by protesters as he addresses a gathering of evangelical Christians.
A handful of protesters shouting "Stop hate! Stop Trump!" and "Refugees are welcome here!" were escorted out of the ballroom as Trump addressed the Faith & Freedom Coalition's Read to Majority Conference in Washington Friday.
Trump stressed his commitment to conservative causes and criticized presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton for her domestic and foreign policy stances.
He said a Trump administration would "restore respect for people of faith."
___
1:10 p.m.
Hillary Clinton is offering an unabashedly feminist attack on GOP rival Donald Trump, in her first speech since becoming the Democratic party's presumptive nominee.
Linking abortion rights and birth control to national economic growth, Clinton argues that Trump would take the country back to a time when "when abortion was illegal women had far fewer options and life for too many women and girls were limited."
She says: "When Donald Trump says let's make America great again that is code for let's take America backward."
Clinton is speaking to the national conference of Planned Parenthood in Washington, D.C. She's thanking the non-profit women's health group for their support in the primary and highlighting her staunch support for abortion rights.
In January, the group backed Clinton, offering its first endorsement in the group's 100 year history.
"This victory belongs to all of you," says Clinton.
___
10:45 a.m.
Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren has arrived at the Washington home of Hillary Clinton for their first meeting since Warren endorsed the presumptive Democratic nominee.
Clinton is in Washington for a speech to Planned Parenthood. Warren was in town for a rare Friday session in the Senate.
Warren threw her support behind Clinton Thursday night, following President Barack Obama. On Thursday, she offered a blistering attack on the presumptive Republican nominee, Donald Trump.
Warren was the only holdout among the Senate's Democratic women and, given her stature among liberals, her endorsement could be an important boost for Clinton. She also is being floated as a potential vice presidential pick for Clinton.
___
10:40 a.m.
It almost went unnoticed, but in a nine-word tangent, Vice President Joe Biden has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president.
Biden had been expected to hold off on his formal endorsement for a day or two after President Barack Obama endorsed Clinton on Thursday. Biden met with Bernie Sanders on Thursday and had been arranging to speak by phone to Clinton.
But in a speech to the American Constitution Society on Thursday evening, Biden said that the next president would likely have to deal with a Supreme Court vacancy for another court term. He added as an aside: "God willing, in my view, it'll be Secretary Clinton."
Biden's office says Friday that the off-the-cuff remark is his endorsement for Clinton. Biden is expected to hit the trail aggressively for Clinton and for Senate Democratic candidates in the coming months.
___
9:10 a.m.
Hillary Clinton is meeting with Sen. Elizabeth Warren, just hours after the progressive hero endorsed the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee.
Clinton is in Washington for a speech to Planned Parenthood. Massachusetts' Warren was in town for a rare Friday session in the Senate. A senior Democratic official said the two women planned to meet.
The official spoke on condition of anonymity to confirm the private meeting, first reported by The Washington Post.
Warren threw her support behind Clinton Thursday night, following President Barack Obama.
Warren was the only holdout among the Senate's Democratic women and, given her stature among liberals, her endorsement could be an important boost for Clinton. She also is being floated as a potential vice presidential pick for Clinton.
___
3:00 a.m.
Democrats are coalescing around Hillary Clinton's presidential bid and looking to reunite the party through a carefully orchestrated plan aimed at nudging rival Bernie Sanders aside.
President Barack Obama's endorsement of Clinton headlined a day of unity for Democrats Thursday as the party prepares for Republican Donald Trump. Amid the message of harmony, Sanders crisscrossed the nation's capital and received praise in meetings with Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and Senate Democratic leaders.
At his campaign rally outside RFK Stadium, Sanders didn't mention Clinton and didn't repeat his calls to persuade superdelegates to support him. Nor did he talk about plans for a contested convention in Philadelphia.
Democrats are wary that divisions that emerged between Clinton and Sanders during the primaries might spill out during next month's Democratic National Convention.

 
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Zen Peach



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  posted on 6/10/2016 at 08:39 PM
Romney is good a promoting trickle-down BOREDOM.


zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

 

Maximum Peach



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  posted on 6/10/2016 at 11:31 PM
Mitt seems intent on destroying what little credibility he had with the tiny group who still liked him.

Who cares?

 

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True Peach



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  posted on 6/11/2016 at 07:04 AM
I'm not a fan of Romney but I wish more Republicans would call out Trump for some of his abhorrent behavior. It seems like the party is content to fall in line for the sake of winning one election and is not concerned with the long term impact of this debacle. Party leaders who support what they know is wrong do not impress me.

 

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  posted on 6/11/2016 at 07:05 AM
quote:
Mitt seems intent on destroying what little credibility he had with the tiny group who still liked him.

Who cares?


Fuji, do you disagree with the premise of Mitt's statement about Trump's racist views? Whether you or anyone cares is a different question.

 

Maximum Peach



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  posted on 6/11/2016 at 07:15 AM
quote:
I'm not a fan of Romney but I wish more Republicans would call out Trump for some of his abhorrent behavior. It seems like the party is content to fall in line for the sake of winning one election and is not concerned with the long term impact of this debacle. Party leaders who support what they know is wrong do not impress me.
And this is different from the D's with Hillary how?

 

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True Peach



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  posted on 6/11/2016 at 07:53 AM
quote:
quote:
I'm not a fan of Romney but I wish more Republicans would call out Trump for some of his abhorrent behavior. It seems like the party is content to fall in line for the sake of winning one election and is not concerned with the long term impact of this debacle. Party leaders who support what they know is wrong do not impress me.
And this is different from the D's with Hillary how?

I think that although Hillary is not a great candidate most of the D's are sincere in their support. They are not afraid of a Hillary presidency. With Trump it seems different. It appears that many prominent R's are repulsed by Trump but don't have the balls to just say so. Look at Ryan, McConnell, even Priebus. It's clear they are not comfortable backing him. I'd have more respect for them if they were less hypocritical about it, and I think it would be better for the direction of the party in the long term. But I understand that it would not be politically expedient. Keep in mind I am not trying to defend Hillary or the D's, and I suspect that if they had a candidate as outrageous as Trump they'd act the same way.

You may say Hillary is just as bad or worse than Trump, and I'd agree that she is but in a different way. Hillary may be corrupt and dishonest but that's not uncommon among politicians, even those considered to be the most successful. But Trump seems to have no concept of the role of President. He has no respect for separation of powers (i.e. intimidating a judge), freedom of religion (i.e. banning Muslims), or equal rights (i.e. degrading women). He has shown no self-restraint. It's as if he believes presidential powers are unlimited and that's dangerous.

 

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  posted on 6/11/2016 at 09:18 AM
The current, entrenched GOP'ers might be afraid of a Trump presidency as you say, but for different reasons than you cite. The emergence of Trump is an abrupt departure away from the typical noodle-spined Republican of today. They view Trump as a threat to their own livelihoods and power. This scares them, and they should be afraid.

I think privately that the emergence of Trump and his popularity scares the hell out of all establishment politicians, and not for the reasons they give on TV like racism, sexism and other isms. They fear a movement which is turning away from them, sick and tired of the same old politics and same old politicians.

The absolute best part is that their own ineptitude and pitiful stewardship is what's led to the the Rise of Trump in the first place, although they would never admit it. And their reaction to Trump is textbook. They choose to run and hide from this fact, instead choosing to try and stoke fear and anger against Trump. It's not working out too well and I'm loving every minute of it.

























[Edited on 6/11/2016 by alloak41]

 

True Peach



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  posted on 6/11/2016 at 09:35 AM
quote:
The current, entrenched GOP'ers might be afraid of a Trump presidency as you say, but for different reasons than you cite. The emergence of Trump is an abrupt departure away from the typical noodle-spined Republican of today. They view Trump as a threat to their own livelihoods and power. This scares them, and they should be afraid.

I think privately that the emergence of Trump and his popularity scares the hell out of all establishment politicians, and not for the reasons they give on TV like racism, sexism and other isms. They fear a movement which is turning away from them, sick and tired of the same old politics and same old politicians.

I think there is some truth in that. There are a lot of reasons to be scared of Trump, or at least to think he's not good for America. I just wish the Republican politicians had the backbone to say what they really think about him. Falling in line behind him will not help to steer the party away from the direction he's taking them.

 

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  posted on 6/11/2016 at 09:55 AM
quote:
quote:
The current, entrenched GOP'ers might be afraid of a Trump presidency as you say, but for different reasons than you cite. The emergence of Trump is an abrupt departure away from the typical noodle-spined Republican of today. They view Trump as a threat to their own livelihoods and power. This scares them, and they should be afraid.

I think privately that the emergence of Trump and his popularity scares the hell out of all establishment politicians, and not for the reasons they give on TV like racism, sexism and other isms. They fear a movement which is turning away from them, sick and tired of the same old politics and same old politicians.

I think there is some truth in that. There are a lot of reasons to be scared of Trump, or at least to think he's not good for America. I just wish the Republican politicians had the backbone to say what they really think about him. Falling in line behind him will not help to steer the party away from the direction he's taking them.


Then there are those that feel Trump gives them many more reasons to be optimistic about him than reasons to fear him. Hypothetically, lets say that in the second year of a Trump presidency the GDP starts growing by 4-5%. We are back to a thriving economy. Due to these factors the deficit is cut to $100 Billion. As a result, more businessmen decide to enter the political arena. The Dow hits 25,000 and we are near full energy independence. Real life experience and economic acumen starts to exert a greater influence than the career politician/lawyer.

Before long, the entire scope of government operations starts to evolve into one measured by cost effectiveness, problem solving, and results rather than good intentions, moral superiority, pandering to groups, cronyism, selling access and favors, and what not. And minority groups? You think they will stand to benefit from a growing and bustling economy, where finding work has become a real possibility once again?

Electing Trump could be a start. You shouldn't be on the Trump bashing (or bashing of his followers) bandwagon until first coming to grips with the reasons behind his appeal....And no, it's not racism.



















[Edited on 6/11/2016 by alloak41]

 

True Peach



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  posted on 6/11/2016 at 10:13 AM
quote:
quote:
quote:
The current, entrenched GOP'ers might be afraid of a Trump presidency as you say, but for different reasons than you cite. The emergence of Trump is an abrupt departure away from the typical noodle-spined Republican of today. They view Trump as a threat to their own livelihoods and power. This scares them, and they should be afraid.

I think privately that the emergence of Trump and his popularity scares the hell out of all establishment politicians, and not for the reasons they give on TV like racism, sexism and other isms. They fear a movement which is turning away from them, sick and tired of the same old politics and same old politicians.

I think there is some truth in that. There are a lot of reasons to be scared of Trump, or at least to think he's not good for America. I just wish the Republican politicians had the backbone to say what they really think about him. Falling in line behind him will not help to steer the party away from the direction he's taking them.


Then there are those that feel Trump gives them many more reasons to be optimistic about him than reasons to fear him. Hypothetically, lets say that in the second year of a Trump presidency the GDP starts growing by 4-5%. We are back to a thriving economy. Due to these factors the deficit is cut to $150 Billion. As a result, more businessmen decide to enter the political arena. The Dow hits 25,000 and we are near full energy independence. Real life experience and economic acumen starts to exert a greater influence than the career politician/lawyer.

Before long, the entire scope of government operations starts to evolve into one measured by cost effectiveness, problem solving, and results rather than good intentions, moral superiority, pandering to groups, cronyism, selling access and favors, and what not.

Electing Trump could be a start. You shouldn't be on the Trump bashing (or bashing of his followers) bandwagon until first coming to grips with the reasons behind his appeal....And no, it's not racism.

Hypothetically in the second year of a Clinton presidency fairies could descend from rainbows and give unicorns to all the children of the world.

By the way, I have not engaged in Trump bashing, at least not in this thread. My targets have been the Republican politicians who don't support him but don't have the guts to be honest about it.

 

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  posted on 6/11/2016 at 10:23 AM
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
The current, entrenched GOP'ers might be afraid of a Trump presidency as you say, but for different reasons than you cite. The emergence of Trump is an abrupt departure away from the typical noodle-spined Republican of today. They view Trump as a threat to their own livelihoods and power. This scares them, and they should be afraid.

I think privately that the emergence of Trump and his popularity scares the hell out of all establishment politicians, and not for the reasons they give on TV like racism, sexism and other isms. They fear a movement which is turning away from them, sick and tired of the same old politics and same old politicians.

I think there is some truth in that. There are a lot of reasons to be scared of Trump, or at least to think he's not good for America. I just wish the Republican politicians had the backbone to say what they really think about him. Falling in line behind him will not help to steer the party away from the direction he's taking them.


Then there are those that feel Trump gives them many more reasons to be optimistic about him than reasons to fear him. Hypothetically, lets say that in the second year of a Trump presidency the GDP starts growing by 4-5%. We are back to a thriving economy. Due to these factors the deficit is cut to $150 Billion. As a result, more businessmen decide to enter the political arena. The Dow hits 25,000 and we are near full energy independence. Real life experience and economic acumen starts to exert a greater influence than the career politician/lawyer.

Before long, the entire scope of government operations starts to evolve into one measured by cost effectiveness, problem solving, and results rather than good intentions, moral superiority, pandering to groups, cronyism, selling access and favors, and what not.

Electing Trump could be a start. You shouldn't be on the Trump bashing (or bashing of his followers) bandwagon until first coming to grips with the reasons behind his appeal....And no, it's not racism.

Hypothetically in the second year of a Clinton presidency fairies could descend from rainbows and give unicorns to all the children of the world.


And to accomplish this the same approach would most likely be employed...

Print the money, borrow it, or both.

 

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  posted on 6/11/2016 at 10:35 AM

Many republicans are willing to sacrifice this election to the democrats. In their eyes,this is the only way to keep the current power structure in place. After 2016, they can then go on fighting back and forth with the democrats over who controls the power and change nothing except enriching themselves and their cronies. There really is not much difference between todays republican and democrat leaders.

 

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  posted on 6/11/2016 at 10:39 AM

it's not an election campaign this time -- it's a stop Donald campaign
he's gotten the nomination through steady "bashing" -- kinda puts it in its place IMV -- helpful to his campaign ("trickle-down racism"? I don't think so Mitt, but keep talkin')
the more people gang up on him with this obviously-transparent melarky, the more it helps Donald's campaign

 

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  posted on 6/11/2016 at 10:39 AM
quote:
The current, entrenched GOP'ers might be afraid of a Trump presidency as you say, but for different reasons than you cite. The emergence of Trump is an abrupt departure away from the typical noodle-spined Republican of today. They view Trump as a threat to their own livelihoods and power. This scares them, and they should be afraid.

I think privately that the emergence of Trump and his popularity scares the hell out of all establishment politicians, and not for the reasons they give on TV like racism, sexism and other isms. They fear a movement which is turning away from them, sick and tired of the same old politics and same old politicians.

The absolute best part is that their own ineptitude and pitiful stewardship is what's led to the the Rise of Trump in the first place, although they would never admit it. And their reaction to Trump is textbook. They choose to run and hide from this fact, instead choosing to try and stoke fear and anger against Trump. It's not working out too well and I'm loving every minute of it.

[Edited on 6/11/2016 by alloak41]


The establishment GOP is afraid of Trump with his racist and misogynist statements & views. They may be establishment, but they are smart enough to know that they already have a hard time attracting minorities & women prior to the arrival of Trump. With Trump they realize he has quickly amped up the messages to the country on the rigid GOP lines. He has taken it to a new low. Trump is on a path to do intermediate term if not long term damage to the GOP in its outreach efforts to expand the base needed to win national elections. We are a diverse nation, but the GOP represents and wins primarily white males and older ones in elections. Watch what happens in November and analyze the exit polls. This will more than reinforce the lack of diversity & outreach that the GOP continues to lose.

 

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  posted on 6/11/2016 at 11:36 AM
This is a smart move on Romney's part as it might reduce the extent the party as a whole is branded as racist. If republicans adopt the strategy of depicting Trump as a racist then they are pretty much conceding the race to Clinton. In doing this they can limit the damage that Trump can do to the party to one or two election cycles.

It may be too little too late, but it is a major defensive move that counters the let's all unify behind this guy and damn the consequences mood in the rest of the party.

The Democrats will clean house with all of the above, and so it is really a question of are there options for partial survival, or should the GOP accept the inevitable collapse of the party. Having Trump as the head of the party is like living with a time bomb that can explode at any moment. All it takes is one wrong tweet sent off if he wakes up in a bad mood, or a case of itchy balls.

 

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  posted on 6/11/2016 at 06:05 PM
quote:
quote:
The current, entrenched GOP'ers might be afraid of a Trump presidency as you say, but for different reasons than you cite. The emergence of Trump is an abrupt departure away from the typical noodle-spined Republican of today. They view Trump as a threat to their own livelihoods and power. This scares them, and they should be afraid.

I think privately that the emergence of Trump and his popularity scares the hell out of all establishment politicians, and not for the reasons they give on TV like racism, sexism and other isms. They fear a movement which is turning away from them, sick and tired of the same old politics and same old politicians.

The absolute best part is that their own ineptitude and pitiful stewardship is what's led to the the Rise of Trump in the first place, although they would never admit it. And their reaction to Trump is textbook. They choose to run and hide from this fact, instead choosing to try and stoke fear and anger against Trump. It's not working out too well and I'm loving every minute of it.

[Edited on 6/11/2016 by alloak41]


The establishment GOP is afraid of Trump with his racist and misogynist statements & views. They may be establishment, but they are smart enough to know that they already have a hard time attracting minorities & women prior to the arrival of Trump. With Trump they realize he has quickly amped up the messages to the country on the rigid GOP lines. He has taken it to a new low. Trump is on a path to do intermediate term if not long term damage to the GOP in its outreach efforts to expand the base needed to win national elections. We are a diverse nation, but the GOP represents and wins primarily white males and older ones in elections. Watch what happens in November and analyze the exit polls. This will more than reinforce the lack of diversity & outreach that the GOP continues to lose.


This is total hogwash. Has it ever occurred to you that Democrats problem with males is worse than the GOP's problem with women? Democrats love to spout off about demographic trends and how the GOP must change to attract this or that, while ignoring their own problems. No Democrat has won the white male vote in 50 years! Is that segment of voters not important enough to ever even mention?

Obama won his two elections against pitiful candidates that couldn't even turn out their own base. Hell, I'd love to get the women vote and the minority vote but acting more like Democrats to get it is a non-starter. That's what's gotten them into trouble and gotten them beat in the first place, and whenever Democrats start advising you on how to win elections it's time to take a pass.

The main concern should not be in attracting women, minorities, or any group but attracting Americans. Let the Democrats worry about their little subset groups, They have to because they would be dead without them.

Luckily for the Dems, many Republicans have bought into this nonsense...and succeeded only in rankling their strongest supporters. Why even run a candidate if you won't even try to win your own base first? And then wonder later why you didn't win, while the experts on the Left assign a lot of bogus reasoning as the answer, hoping that yet even more Republicans buy into their garbage (advice.)








[Edited on 6/11/2016 by alloak41]

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 6/11/2016 at 06:12 PM
quote:
This is a smart move on Romney's part as it might reduce the extent the party as a whole is branded as racist.


Too late. Hasn't this already happened?

If you recall, any opposition to Obama and his policies was due to racism. Remember?

 

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  posted on 6/11/2016 at 06:30 PM
quote:
quote:
quote:
The current, entrenched GOP'ers might be afraid of a Trump presidency as you say, but for different reasons than you cite. The emergence of Trump is an abrupt departure away from the typical noodle-spined Republican of today. They view Trump as a threat to their own livelihoods and power. This scares them, and they should be afraid.

I think privately that the emergence of Trump and his popularity scares the hell out of all establishment politicians, and not for the reasons they give on TV like racism, sexism and other isms. They fear a movement which is turning away from them, sick and tired of the same old politics and same old politicians.

The absolute best part is that their own ineptitude and pitiful stewardship is what's led to the the Rise of Trump in the first place, although they would never admit it. And their reaction to Trump is textbook. They choose to run and hide from this fact, instead choosing to try and stoke fear and anger against Trump. It's not working out too well and I'm loving every minute of it.

[Edited on 6/11/2016 by alloak41]


The establishment GOP is afraid of Trump with his racist and misogynist statements & views. They may be establishment, but they are smart enough to know that they already have a hard time attracting minorities & women prior to the arrival of Trump. With Trump they realize he has quickly amped up the messages to the country on the rigid GOP lines. He has taken it to a new low. Trump is on a path to do intermediate term if not long term damage to the GOP in its outreach efforts to expand the base needed to win national elections. We are a diverse nation, but the GOP represents and wins primarily white males and older ones in elections. Watch what happens in November and analyze the exit polls. This will more than reinforce the lack of diversity & outreach that the GOP continues to lose.


This is total hogwash. Has it ever occurred to you that Democrats problem with males is worse than the GOP's problem with women? Democrats love to spout off about demographic trends and how the GOP must change to attract this or that, while ignoring their own problems. No Democrat has won the white male vote in 50 years! Is that segment of voters not important enough to ever even mention?

Obama won his two elections against pitiful candidates that couldn't even turn out their own base. Hell, I'd love to get the women vote and the minority vote but acting more like Democrats to get it is a non-starter. That's what's gotten them into trouble and gotten them beat in the first place, and whenever Democrats start advising you on how to win elections it's time to take a pass.

The main concern should not be in attracting women, minorities, or any group but attracting Americans. Let the Democrats worry about their little subset groups, They have to because they would be dead without them.


Your closing paragraph sums it perfectly. The GOP autopsy performed after the 2012 election by GOP leaders would dismiss you. They realize they need sectors - however you choose to "label" them. That is just reality. In Presidential Elections where large percentages vote, the Democrats understand the way to appeal to more sectors or Americans (choose your choice of terminology). Look at the difference in policy, platform, and inclusion.

Go back and study the results of the last 2 elections by various demographics and maybe it will educate you a bit. This election will follow the same pattern by demographics - probably with yet larger differentials this time around.

You are correct that the GOP usually wins males. You do know that females make up a bigger % of the voting block, don't you? And in spite of Trump thinking that women love him, he will get trounced there in greater numbers than HC will lose the male vote.

You say, "Obama won his two elections against pitiful candidates" So alloak, how do you rate Trump as a candidate? Is he great, or is he pitiful?

I'll ask you again - will you vote for him? Is he your man? Does he represent you well?


 

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  posted on 6/11/2016 at 07:03 PM
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
The current, entrenched GOP'ers might be afraid of a Trump presidency as you say, but for different reasons than you cite. The emergence of Trump is an abrupt departure away from the typical noodle-spined Republican of today. They view Trump as a threat to their own livelihoods and power. This scares them, and they should be afraid.

I think privately that the emergence of Trump and his popularity scares the hell out of all establishment politicians, and not for the reasons they give on TV like racism, sexism and other isms. They fear a movement which is turning away from them, sick and tired of the same old politics and same old politicians.

The absolute best part is that their own ineptitude and pitiful stewardship is what's led to the the Rise of Trump in the first place, although they would never admit it. And their reaction to Trump is textbook. They choose to run and hide from this fact, instead choosing to try and stoke fear and anger against Trump. It's not working out too well and I'm loving every minute of it.

[Edited on 6/11/2016 by alloak41]


The establishment GOP is afraid of Trump with his racist and misogynist statements & views. They may be establishment, but they are smart enough to know that they already have a hard time attracting minorities & women prior to the arrival of Trump. With Trump they realize he has quickly amped up the messages to the country on the rigid GOP lines. He has taken it to a new low. Trump is on a path to do intermediate term if not long term damage to the GOP in its outreach efforts to expand the base needed to win national elections. We are a diverse nation, but the GOP represents and wins primarily white males and older ones in elections. Watch what happens in November and analyze the exit polls. This will more than reinforce the lack of diversity & outreach that the GOP continues to lose.


This is total hogwash. Has it ever occurred to you that Democrats problem with males is worse than the GOP's problem with women? Democrats love to spout off about demographic trends and how the GOP must change to attract this or that, while ignoring their own problems. No Democrat has won the white male vote in 50 years! Is that segment of voters not important enough to ever even mention?

Obama won his two elections against pitiful candidates that couldn't even turn out their own base. Hell, I'd love to get the women vote and the minority vote but acting more like Democrats to get it is a non-starter. That's what's gotten them into trouble and gotten them beat in the first place, and whenever Democrats start advising you on how to win elections it's time to take a pass.

The main concern should not be in attracting women, minorities, or any group but attracting Americans. Let the Democrats worry about their little subset groups, They have to because they would be dead without them.


Your closing paragraph sums it perfectly. The GOP autopsy performed after the 2012 election by GOP leaders would dismiss you. They realize they need sectors - however you choose to "label" them. That is just reality. In Presidential Elections where large percentages vote, the Democrats understand the way to appeal to more sectors or Americans (choose your choice of terminology). Look at the difference in policy, platform, and inclusion.

Go back and study the results of the last 2 elections by various demographics and maybe it will educate you a bit. This election will follow the same pattern by demographics - probably with yet larger differentials this time around.

You are correct that the GOP usually wins males. You do know that females make up a bigger % of the voting block, don't you? And in spite of Trump thinking that women love him, he will get trounced there in greater numbers than HC will lose the male vote.

You say, "Obama won his two elections against pitiful candidates" So alloak, how do you rate Trump as a candidate? Is he great, or is he pitiful?

I'll ask you again - will you vote for him? Is he your man? Does he represent you well?



1. Autopsy performed by "GOP leaders?" With blindfolds and earplugs? The same leaders who still don't get it....You can't win an election by acting more like Democrats, hoping Democrat voters will vote for you over a Democrat. Please! And I still don't think they get it. I'm a Conservative VOTER, millions upon millions just like me. Don't take my word, go ahead and believe these clowns. They don't listen either.

2. You and your demographics. Quality of candidate, their message, and the campaign they run vs the relative strength of the challenger based on the same is MUCH more meaningful in determining the winner than demographics. I guess we agree to disagree on that one.

3. Time will tell. While you're hung up your demographics, I'll be watching who the most Americans vote for.

4. Did you think he'd be where he is today? I certainly didn't. Nobody did. He was pronounced dead numerous times and just continued to get stronger. He pretty much blew the doors off the competition. I'd say he's a pretty fair candidate based on these.

5. I'll gladly vote for him. I've been waiting for someone from a business background, rather than a career politician for a while now. Someone with that background deserves a chance. He has a lot of potential to be a surprise on the upside IMO. We already know what we're getting with Hilary, continuation of a dead straight pathway toward the edge of a cliff. We have GOT to get this thing turned around and I have more faith in Trump.


 

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4198
(4204 all sites)
Registered: 10/5/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/11/2016 at 07:58 PM
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
The current, entrenched GOP'ers might be afraid of a Trump presidency as you say, but for different reasons than you cite. The emergence of Trump is an abrupt departure away from the typical noodle-spined Republican of today. They view Trump as a threat to their own livelihoods and power. This scares them, and they should be afraid.

I think privately that the emergence of Trump and his popularity scares the hell out of all establishment politicians, and not for the reasons they give on TV like racism, sexism and other isms. They fear a movement which is turning away from them, sick and tired of the same old politics and same old politicians.

The absolute best part is that their own ineptitude and pitiful stewardship is what's led to the the Rise of Trump in the first place, although they would never admit it. And their reaction to Trump is textbook. They choose to run and hide from this fact, instead choosing to try and stoke fear and anger against Trump. It's not working out too well and I'm loving every minute of it.

[Edited on 6/11/2016 by alloak41]


The establishment GOP is afraid of Trump with his racist and misogynist statements & views. They may be establishment, but they are smart enough to know that they already have a hard time attracting minorities & women prior to the arrival of Trump. With Trump they realize he has quickly amped up the messages to the country on the rigid GOP lines. He has taken it to a new low. Trump is on a path to do intermediate term if not long term damage to the GOP in its outreach efforts to expand the base needed to win national elections. We are a diverse nation, but the GOP represents and wins primarily white males and older ones in elections. Watch what happens in November and analyze the exit polls. This will more than reinforce the lack of diversity & outreach that the GOP continues to lose.


This is total hogwash. Has it ever occurred to you that Democrats problem with males is worse than the GOP's problem with women? Democrats love to spout off about demographic trends and how the GOP must change to attract this or that, while ignoring their own problems. No Democrat has won the white male vote in 50 years! Is that segment of voters not important enough to ever even mention?

Obama won his two elections against pitiful candidates that couldn't even turn out their own base. Hell, I'd love to get the women vote and the minority vote but acting more like Democrats to get it is a non-starter. That's what's gotten them into trouble and gotten them beat in the first place, and whenever Democrats start advising you on how to win elections it's time to take a pass.

The main concern should not be in attracting women, minorities, or any group but attracting Americans. Let the Democrats worry about their little subset groups, They have to because they would be dead without them.


Your closing paragraph sums it perfectly. The GOP autopsy performed after the 2012 election by GOP leaders would dismiss you. They realize they need sectors - however you choose to "label" them. That is just reality. In Presidential Elections where large percentages vote, the Democrats understand the way to appeal to more sectors or Americans (choose your choice of terminology). Look at the difference in policy, platform, and inclusion.

Go back and study the results of the last 2 elections by various demographics and maybe it will educate you a bit. This election will follow the same pattern by demographics - probably with yet larger differentials this time around.

You are correct that the GOP usually wins males. You do know that females make up a bigger % of the voting block, don't you? And in spite of Trump thinking that women love him, he will get trounced there in greater numbers than HC will lose the male vote.

You say, "Obama won his two elections against pitiful candidates" So alloak, how do you rate Trump as a candidate? Is he great, or is he pitiful?

I'll ask you again - will you vote for him? Is he your man? Does he represent you well?



1. Autopsy performed by "GOP leaders?" With blindfolds and earplugs? The same leaders who still don't get it....You can't win an election by acting more like Democrats, hoping Democrat voters will vote for you over a Democrat. Please! And I still don't think they get it. I'm a Conservative VOTER, millions upon millions just like me. Don't take my word, go ahead and believe these clowns. They don't listen either.

2. You and your demographics. Quality of candidate, their message, and the campaign they run vs the relative strength of the challenger based on the same is MUCH more meaningful in determining the winner than demographics. I guess we agree to disagree on that one.

3. Time will tell. While you're hung up your demographics, I'll be watching who the most Americans vote for.

4. Did you think he'd be where he is today? I certainly didn't. Nobody did. He was pronounced dead numerous times and just continued to get stronger. He pretty much blew the doors off the competition. I'd say he's a pretty fair candidate based on these.

5. I'll gladly vote for him. I've been waiting for someone from a business background, rather than a career politician for a while now. Someone with that background deserves a chance. He has a lot of potential to be a surprise on the upside IMO. We already know what we're getting with Hilary, continuation of a dead straight pathway toward the edge of a cliff. We have GOT to get this thing turned around and I have more faith in Trump.




This is one election where I do feel sorry for GOP leaders, as they know they now have a toxic candidate that will drive them into a ditch. Let's see the damage he does to other GOP candidates.

You obviously don't get math and demographics. No need to waste any time trying to convince you of the importance of these. I get your preference for high level & generalized statements.

Did I think Trump would be here today? Pretty early on it was apparent that the 16 or so other GOP candidates didn't know how to handle him with all of his entertainment value and statements like his famous " there was blood coming out of her wherever" when referring to Megyn Kelly. He was a successful candidate to primarily angry GOP voters who are just a subset of the voting electorate which won't translate to the general election.

Glad you like him enough to vote for him. Do you identify with his Megyn Kelly statement? His statements about women - being fat pigs, dogs, etc.? His statements about Carly Fiorina's face? Etc.?

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 16027
(16019 all sites)
Registered: 10/13/2007
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/11/2016 at 08:58 PM
quote:
The current, entrenched GOP'ers might be afraid of a Trump presidency as you say, but for different reasons than you cite. The emergence of Trump is an abrupt departure away from the typical noodle-spined Republican of today. They view Trump as a threat to their own livelihoods and power. This scares them, and they should be afraid.

I think privately that the emergence of Trump and his popularity scares the hell out of all establishment politicians, and not for the reasons they give on TV like racism, sexism and other isms. They fear a movement which is turning away from them, sick and tired of the same old politics and same old politicians.

The absolute best part is that their own ineptitude and pitiful stewardship is what's led to the the Rise of Trump in the first place, although they would never admit it. And their reaction to Trump is textbook. They choose to run and hide from this fact, instead choosing to try and stoke fear and anger against Trump. It's not working out too well and I'm loving every minute of it.

[Edited on 6/11/2016 by alloak41]


The establishment GOP is afraid of Trump with his racist and misogynist statements & views. They may be establishment, but they are smart enough to know that they already have a hard time attracting minorities & women prior to the arrival of Trump. With Trump they realize he has quickly amped up the messages to the country on the rigid GOP lines. He has taken it to a new low. Trump is on a path to do intermediate term if not long term damage to the GOP in its outreach efforts to expand the base needed to win national elections. We are a diverse nation, but the GOP represents and wins primarily white males and older ones in elections. Watch what happens in November and analyze the exit polls. This will more than reinforce the lack of diversity & outreach that the GOP continues to lose.


This is total hogwash. Has it ever occurred to you that Democrats problem with males is worse than the GOP's problem with women? Democrats love to spout off about demographic trends and how the GOP must change to attract this or that, while ignoring their own problems. No Democrat has won the white male vote in 50 years! Is that segment of voters not important enough to ever even mention?

Obama won his two elections against pitiful candidates that couldn't even turn out their own base. Hell, I'd love to get the women vote and the minority vote but acting more like Democrats to get it is a non-starter. That's what's gotten them into trouble and gotten them beat in the first place, and whenever Democrats start advising you on how to win elections it's time to take a pass.

The main concern should not be in attracting women, minorities, or any group but attracting Americans. Let the Democrats worry about their little subset groups, They have to because they would be dead without them.


Your closing paragraph sums it perfectly. The GOP autopsy performed after the 2012 election by GOP leaders would dismiss you. They realize they need sectors - however you choose to "label" them. That is just reality. In Presidential Elections where large percentages vote, the Democrats understand the way to appeal to more sectors or Americans (choose your choice of terminology). Look at the difference in policy, platform, and inclusion.

Go back and study the results of the last 2 elections by various demographics and maybe it will educate you a bit. This election will follow the same pattern by demographics - probably with yet larger differentials this time around.

You are correct that the GOP usually wins males. You do know that females make up a bigger % of the voting block, don't you? And in spite of Trump thinking that women love him, he will get trounced there in greater numbers than HC will lose the male vote.

You say, "Obama won his two elections against pitiful candidates" So alloak, how do you rate Trump as a candidate? Is he great, or is he pitiful?

I'll ask you again - will you vote for him? Is he your man? Does he represent you well?



1. Autopsy performed by "GOP leaders?" With blindfolds and earplugs? The same leaders who still don't get it....You can't win an election by acting more like Democrats, hoping Democrat voters will vote for you over a Democrat. Please! And I still don't think they get it. I'm a Conservative VOTER, millions upon millions just like me. Don't take my word, go ahead and believe these clowns. They don't listen either.

2. You and your demographics. Quality of candidate, their message, and the campaign they run vs the relative strength of the challenger based on the same is MUCH more meaningful in determining the winner than demographics. I guess we agree to disagree on that one.

3. Time will tell. While you're hung up your demographics, I'll be watching who the most Americans vote for.

4. Did you think he'd be where he is today? I certainly didn't. Nobody did. He was pronounced dead numerous times and just continued to get stronger. He pretty much blew the doors off the competition. I'd say he's a pretty fair candidate based on these.

5. I'll gladly vote for him. I've been waiting for someone from a business background, rather than a career politician for a while now. Someone with that background deserves a chance. He has a lot of potential to be a surprise on the upside IMO. We already know what we're getting with Hilary, continuation of a dead straight pathway toward the edge of a cliff. We have GOT to get this thing turned around and I have more faith in Trump.




This is one election where I do feel sorry for GOP leaders, as they know they now have a toxic candidate that will drive them into a ditch. Let's see the damage he does to other GOP candidates.

You obviously don't get math and demographics. No need to waste any time trying to convince you of the importance of these. I get your preference for high level & generalized statements.

Did I think Trump would be here today? Pretty early on it was apparent that the 16 or so other GOP candidates didn't know how to handle him with all of his entertainment value and statements like his famous " there was blood coming out of her wherever" when referring to Megyn Kelly. He was a successful candidate to primarily angry GOP voters who are just a subset of the voting electorate which won't translate to the general election.

Glad you like him enough to vote for him. Do you identify with his Megyn Kelly statement? His statements about women - being fat pigs, dogs, etc.? His statements about Carly Fiorina's face? Etc.?


1. We'll see. I don't automatically stigmatize a large group of people based on the actions of a single person. Trump may at some point drive himself into a ditch, but that's totally different matter.

2. Actually I have a firm grasp on both mathematics and demographics, both prominent in my field of study as well as their utilization in the course of my work life. We merely differ on the importance of demographics in determining a presidential winner. I tend to evaluate specific candidates from election to election but that's just me.

3. What makes you so sure of that? The easily offended PC crowd would likely never vote for a Republican anyway. So what did he lose? Nothing really.

4. See #3. Doesn't really make a hill of beans. Again, those who are outraged probably wouldn't vote Republican anyway, but seem intent on trying to make sure everyone is just as offended as they are.

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 8132
(8132 all sites)
Registered: 7/18/2010
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/12/2016 at 10:17 AM
quote:
The main concern should not be in attracting women, minorities, or any group but attracting Americans.


You probably don't mean this the way it sounds, I hope.

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 16027
(16019 all sites)
Registered: 10/13/2007
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/12/2016 at 12:21 PM
quote:
quote:
The main concern should not be in attracting women, minorities, or any group but attracting Americans.


You probably don't mean this the way it sounds, I hope.


Your right. I really meant to say the main concern should be attracting the Martian vote.

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 8410
(8411 all sites)
Registered: 3/22/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/12/2016 at 03:17 PM
quote:
This is a smart move on Romney's part as it might reduce the extent the party as a whole is branded as racist. If republicans adopt the strategy of depicting Trump as a racist then they are pretty much conceding the race to Clinton. In doing this they can limit the damage that Trump can do to the party to one or two election cycles.

It may be too little too late, but it is a major defensive move that counters the let's all unify behind this guy and damn the consequences mood in the rest of the party.

The Democrats will clean house with all of the above, and so it is really a question of are there options for partial survival, or should the GOP accept the inevitable collapse of the party. Having Trump as the head of the party is like living with a time bomb that can explode at any moment. All it takes is one wrong tweet sent off if he wakes up in a bad mood, or a case of itchy balls.
Gotta love these endless predictions of doom from D's about the R's. Of course it's always based on what D's dislike, never accounting for the fact that if the R's thought and felt like the D's, they would be D's in the first place.

If Hillary wins, it will only strengthen what's already happened in the states in opposition to Obama's policies. R's will retain governorships in the majority, will retain the House - maybe the Senate - and probably grow both in the midterms. In other words; get ready for more gridlock.

 

____________________
Obamacare: To insure the uninsured, we first make the insured
uninsured and then make them pay more to be insured again,
so the original uninsured can be insured for free.

 
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