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Author: Subject: Rolling Stone review of "Win Lose or Draw" Tony Glover~1975

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  posted on 2/10/2007 at 04:03 PM
Found this on the web, Thought all might like to read this:

This is the Allman Brothers' sixth album, one many people never expected to see. Their last release, Brothers and Sisters, came out two years ago, and since then band members have seemed to be spinning off in separate orbits. When work on this album began in the spring, fans sighed in relief.

Win, Lose or Draw continues in the tradition established by the ABB from their first record — funky originals and ballads spiced with classic blues and spacey, jazz-tinged instrumental work. Rather than self-consciously trying to break new musical ground here, the band just adds more and better tunes in the veins they mine so well.

All but two of the seven tracks—the first and the last—are original. The core is ABB all the way. "Can't Lose What You Never Had" is a Muddy Waters song (in an interview Waters once named it as his favorite composition) and it's given full Brothers treatment here. Their version is more throbbing and ominous than the original, with insidious slide guitar fills. Allman personalizes the classic lyric a bit, over pulsing and entwining syncopated backing. Betts takes most of the solo rides, stretching out with driving slide and finger work.

Both the title song and "Nevertheless" were written by Gregg Allman. The latter sounds like a stepchild of a couple of songs from the Brothers' second LP. It has touches of the melancholy melody of "Please Call Home" and some of the oddly accented and convoluted lick lines of "Leave My Blues at Home." Once again, Betts does most of the solo spots.

"Win, Lose or Draw" is the song that hits most people hardest on first hearing. It's an interior monolog movie of a man in jail and the changes he goes through. "Oh I'm so farrrr away," Gregg sings with a clear and aching vocal (his voice here isn't as gravelly as usual, which also helps set the mood), and Betts responds with subtle and moving slide work. The picture is of a man locked up, watching his woman slip away, lost in futility ("cold desperation I feel") in an anonymous cell with a stranger. Though not a blues in style or structure, it's sad and moving.

Richard Betts does vocal leads on his two songs, and as you might expect, they're more country tinged. "Just Another Love Song" is close in spirit in Betts's Highway Call album though the lyrics are touched with bitterness. It's a woman leaving-home song, and though Betts's guitar has its usual fleet and lilting sound, there's pain in his playing, too: "Just another lonesome guitar ringing, only difference is, this time it's one of mine."

Percussion shines on "Louisiana Lou and Three Card Monty John," a bouncy, gambling-man saga. Drummers Butch Trucks and Jaimoe work on and off each other, like syncopated jumping beans. Their interplay pops, and you can almost see the grins on their faces.

The instrumental, "High Falls," runs almost 14 minutes—but it seems more like four, Another Betts composition, it's a perfect example of the kind of dynamics that sets the Brothers instrumentally so far above most bands. The guitarist's theme sounds like it could be a soundtrack for an Italian move or a big-sky Western—Betts has a knack for finding new but instantly familiar riffs that you'd swear you've heard before but haven't. Like most of their instrumentals, this is kinetic; the theme is stated, improvised on, abandoned, rediscovered, intensified and finally mellowly resolved. (Especially smokin' bass by Lamar Williams and building keyboard rides by Chuck Leavell.)

The album closes with "Sweet Mama" by Billy Joe Shaver (who wrote most of Waylon Jennings's Honky Tonk Heroes album). Betts does the vocal and, once more, most of the solos on slide guitar, but I swear I hear the ghost of Brother Duane in this song. Betts learned his slide playing from Duane, so naturally there were always similarities, but each had his own distinctive. touch—in spots here, the sound and feel is so close to Duane, it's almost eerie. Still, the song is a good-timey and rocking close to the album.

This is a record that grows on you. The more you hear it the more neat little subtleties you hear—the interplay is as tight as ever. If you're into rumors, you'll believe what you want anyway, but the Brothers just began an extensive tour and, on the evidence of this LP, they are together and riding high once again. (RS 199)



TONY GLOVER


[Edited on 2/10/2007 by BIGV]

 

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  posted on 2/10/2007 at 04:14 PM
quote:
Found this on the web, Thought all might like to read this:

This is the Allman Brothers' sixth album, one many people never expected to see. Their last release, Brothers and Sisters, came out two years ago, and since then band members have seemed to be spinning off in separate orbits. When work on this album began in the spring, fans sighed in relief.

Win, Lose or Draw continues in the tradition established by the ABB from their first record — funky originals and ballads spiced with classic blues and spacey, jazz-tinged instrumental work. Rather than self-consciously trying to break new musical ground here, the band just adds more and better tunes in the veins they mine so well.

All but two of the seven tracks—the first and the last—are original. The core is ABB all the way. "Can't Lose What You Never Had" is a Muddy Waters song (in an interview Waters once named it as his favorite composition) and it's given full Brothers treatment here. Their version is more throbbing and ominous than the original, with insidious slide guitar fills. Allman personalizes the classic lyric a bit, over pulsing and entwining syncopated backing. Betts takes most of the solo rides, stretching out with driving slide and finger work.

Both the title song and "Nevertheless" were written by Gregg Allman. The latter sounds like a stepchild of a couple of songs from the Brothers' second LP. It has touches of the melancholy melody of "Please Call Home" and some of the oddly accented and convoluted lick lines of "Leave My Blues at Home." Once again, Betts does most of the solo spots.

"Win, Lose or Draw" is the song that hits most people hardest on first hearing. It's an interior monolog movie of a man in jail and the changes he goes through. "Oh I'm so farrrr away," Gregg sings with a clear and aching vocal (his voice here isn't as gravelly as usual, which also helps set the mood), and Betts responds with subtle and moving slide work. The picture is of a man locked up, watching his woman slip away, lost in futility ("cold desperation I feel") in an anonymous cell with a stranger. Though not a blues in style or structure, it's sad and moving.

Richard Betts does vocal leads on his two songs, and as you might expect, they're more country tinged. "Just Another Love Song" is close in spirit in Betts's Highway Call album though the lyrics are touched with bitterness. It's a woman leaving-home song, and though Betts's guitar has its usual fleet and lilting sound, there's pain in his playing, too: "Just another lonesome guitar ringing, only difference is, this time it's one of mine."

Percussion shines on "Louisiana Lou and Three Card Monty John," a bouncy, gambling-man saga. Drummers Butch Trucks and Jaimoe work on and off each other, like syncopated jumping beans. Their interplay pops, and you can almost see the grins on their faces.

The instrumental, "High Falls," runs almost 14 minutes—but it seems more like four, Another Betts composition, it's a perfect example of the kind of dynamics that sets the Brothers instrumentally so far above most bands. The guitarist's theme sounds like it could be a soundtrack for an Italian move or a big-sky Western—Betts has a knack for finding new but instantly familiar riffs that you'd swear you've heard before but haven't. Like most of their instrumentals, this is kinetic; the theme is stated, improvised on, abandoned, rediscovered, intensified and finally mellowly resolved. (Especially smokin' bass by Lamar Williams and building keyboard rides by Chuck Leavell.)

The album closes with "Sweet Mama" by Billy Joe Shaver (who wrote most of Waylon Jennings's Honky Tonk Heroes album). Betts does the vocal and, once more, most of the solos on slide guitar, but I swear I hear the ghost of Brother Duane in this song. Betts learned his slide playing from Duane, so naturally there were always similarities, but each had his own distinctive. touch—in spots here, the sound and feel is so close to Duane, it's almost eerie. Still, the song is a good-timey and rocking close to the album.

This is a record that grows on you. The more you hear it the more neat little subtleties you hear—the interplay is as tight as ever. If you're into rumors, you'll believe what you want anyway, but the Brothers just began an extensive tour and, on the evidence of this LP, they are together and riding high once again. (RS 199)



TONY GLOVER


[Edited on 2/10/2007 by BIGV]


Funny how today this album is universally panned, including, I think, in the Rolling Stone album guide. Glover seemed to like it in 1975.

Doug

 

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  posted on 2/10/2007 at 04:28 PM
quote:
Funny how today this album is universally panned, including, I think, in the Rolling Stone album guide. Glover seemed to like it in 1975.

Doug
quote:
I know I did then,and I still do.

quote:
The instrumental, "High Falls," runs almost 14 minutes—but it seems more like four, Another Betts composition, it's a perfect example of the kind of dynamics that sets the Brothers instrumentally so far above most bands. The guitarist's theme sounds like it could be a soundtrack for an Italian move or a big-sky Western—Betts has a knack for finding new but instantly familiar riffs that you'd swear you've heard before but haven't. Like most of their instrumentals, this is kinetic; the theme is stated, improvised on, abandoned, rediscovered, intensified and finally mellowly resolved. (Especially smokin' bass by Lamar Williams and building keyboard rides by Chuck Leavell.)
quote:


Thanks Vic!

 

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  posted on 2/10/2007 at 04:46 PM
quote:
quote:
Funny how today this album is universally panned, including, I think, in the Rolling Stone album guide. Glover seemed to like it in 1975.

Doug
quote:
I know I did then,and I still do.
quote:


Me too, though not necessarily for the reasons stated in the review. Mistakes aside, Tony's heart was in the right place -- there was no slide guitar playing, however, on Can't Lose What You Never Had, and the comparision of Nevertheless to Leave My Blues At Home and/or Please Call Home -- well, journalistic license I guess. Personally I never heard any similarities.
I do like what Tony wrote about Louisiana Lou -- that to me has always been way underrated -- it must have been quite an embarrasing moment for Tony, however, when he found out that Butch & Jaimoe weren't the drummers on it. Ouch!
Thanks for posting that BigV

 

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  posted on 2/10/2007 at 05:46 PM
I have never panned it then and now. I was doing a college radio show when it came out in the fall of 75. It along with Fleetwood Mac the "White album" &" Ec was here" ,Jeff beck "blow by Blow," and the feat’s "last record album "were my most played records and funny enough, all of them were big departures from what folks expected from them.. All are still very listenable to me to this day. As far as the brothers were concerned, I was so damn happy they released anything after that long wait I overlooked any short comings of the record. IMO the critics and the new fans at the time set the bar to high. The Eagles bugged me right then - I thought "One of these Nights" sucked but it was the big seller then. There was a changing of the guard going on right about then, and what the Brothers and others had done for paving the creative paths in Fm rock was about to really pay off for a new breed of FM static hard rock Bands.

At the time I remember the reviews were mixed while it did jump on the Billboard charts fast only to wane by the new year while EAP and Fillmore still were there. If the brothers had continued to tour they could have worked through the critics and the stigma of that album and stayed on the top a couple of more years. IMO anyway

[Edited on 2/10/2007 by Bingylandmusic]

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 01:04 AM
"Win Lose or Draw" is one of Gregg's greatest compositions. He really "sings it like he means it". And the moaning guitar is wonderful.
Songs like these separate the men from the boys. Only a seasoned singer can pull off the slow songs. And only Gregg could have written and sang this one. Straight from the heart once again.
When this record came out I was a senior in high school and bought everything that came out on Capricorn. Thanks for posting this review and taking me back to a golden era.
Thank God we still have the ABB, Mule, and Derek Trucks Band. I'd have little use for my ears if we didn't.

[Edited on 2/11/2007 by Heartfixer57]

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 01:44 AM
quote:
"Win Lose or Draw" is one of Gregg's greatest compositions. He really "sings it like he means it". And the moaning guitar is wonderful.
Songs like these separate the men from the boys. Only a seasoned singer can pull off the slow songs. And only Gregg could have written and sang this one. Straight from the heart once again.
When this record came out I was a senior in high school and bought everything that came out on Capricorn. Thanks for posting this review and taking me back to a golden era.
Thank God we still have the ABB, Mule, and Derek Trucks Band. I'd have little use for my ears if we didn't.

[Edited on 2/11/2007 by Heartfixer57]

you is such a smart man

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 01:55 AM
I am so glad you posted this review. I think I own most of ABB and Gregg's CDs
but I heard only bad things about "Win, Lose or Draw" so I never bought it.
I'm going to buy it now. And many thanks.

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 03:09 AM

quote:
Thank God we still have the ABB, Mule, and Derek Trucks Band. I'd have little use for my ears if we didn't.

I couldn't agree more ... except I'd add the Tinsley Ellis Band and the Donna Hopkins Band to that list.

quote:
Betts has a knack for finding new but instantly familiar riffs that you'd swear you've heard before but haven't.

Yes, this is Dickey's trademark, the knack for finding the music inside you and presenting it to you as if it were new. Only the very best songwriters (in our musical world, at least) can perform this magic. I'll never forget the very first time I heard Maki Madni (titled Nusrat at the time) and it seemed as if the melody conveyed some sort of musical universal truth that I already knew but had never heard before. Even my (very young) kids loved it.

And yes, songwriters Tinsley Ellis (Devil for a Dime and others) and Donna Hopkins (Don't Ask Why and others) have done the same thing for me.

Lucky me!

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 03:09 AM

quote:
Thank God we still have the ABB, Mule, and Derek Trucks Band. I'd have little use for my ears if we didn't.

I couldn't agree more ... except I'd add the Tinsley Ellis Band and the Donna Hopkins Band to that list.

quote:
Betts has a knack for finding new but instantly familiar riffs that you'd swear you've heard before but haven't.

Yes, this is Dickey's trademark, the knack for finding the music inside you and presenting it to you as if it were new. Only the very best songwriters (in our musical world, at least) can perform this magic. I'll never forget the very first time I heard Maki Madni (titled Nusrat at the time) and it seemed as if the melody conveyed some sort of musical universal truth that I already knew but had never heard before. Even my (very young) kids loved it.

And yes, songwriters Tinsley Ellis (Devil for a Dime and others) and Donna Hopkins (Don't Ask Why and others) have done the same thing for me.

Lucky me!

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 07:44 AM
I too couldn't wait for Win, Lose or Draw and was psyched when i heard it. I loved all the
Gregg stuff, Nevertheless is one of my all time favorites. The Muddy cover is also great. I'm jaded on my interest in the lp due to the situation with the internal termoil of band at that time. As time passes and you put it up against the other music that was out at that time it is very, very good. We Brothers fan do set the bar high, but when you hear Gregg growl out, "had a cozy little home, got drunk, burn't it down, people ain't that sad" Man, it sends goosebumps down my back. I gotta download this on to my ipod.

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 09:58 AM
One of the reasons this album was "lost in the shuffle" was that it followed "Brothers And Sisters" and that record was such a monster both artistically and commercially. And the inner turmoil in the band did not help much for sure.

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 10:03 AM
BIGV,

Thanks for posting this review. I remember having this album back when it came out. It was a good album, but I think one of the reasons it isn't considered one of the ABB "Classic" albums is that it had to follow "Live at the Fillmore East", "Eat A Peach" and "Brothers & Sisters". Truth is, is that any one of those albums would be hard for a band to follow up with, much less all three. Also, while "Win, Lose and Draw" certainly had good songs and good playing on the album, in a lot of ways, this was the first ABB album that didn't have a really strong "band feel" about it. It's the difference between "the Allman Brothers Band" and 'THE ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND". Nevertheless, would like to see the current version of the ABB to start doing some of these songs. Certainly "Win, Lose or Draw' would be a great song for the band to bring back, as would be "Can't Lose What You Never Had". I believe the current version of the ABB has played "High Falls" on occasions, but wouldn't mind if they played it a little more often.

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 10:21 AM
Am not sure how often the ABB has played High Falls, but Dickey opened many of his shows last summer with it with Great Southern.
The Brothers did play Can't Lose What You Never Had last summer at Meadowbrook. Am not sure how often they've played that one but it was awesome to see it played live again. Most of the other songs from Win Lose or Draw -- that one, Just Another Love Song, Nevertheless, Louisiana Lou and Sweet Mama -- haven't been played since 75 or 76 (a live version of Nevertheless is on the Wipe the Windows album).

Along with some of the other albums Mark mentioned, Tucker's Searchin' For A Rainbow was released at about the same time as Win Lose or Draw -- what a fine album as well.

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 10:44 AM
By contrast, here is the review that is up on allmusic.com:

An unexpectedly poor showing from the group, considering the two-year lag between albums and what had come before. Despite a good cover of Muddy Waters' "Can't Lose What You Never Had" — highlighted by a great Dickey Betts solo — as an opener, there's not much here that's first-rate. The band sounds lethargic, although they still play decently. The title track and Dickey Betts' instrumental "High Falls" are among the few highlights, decent but unexceptional performances sparked by Betts' playing (which is engaging even on the loser tracks like "Louisiana Lou"). The album's main fault lies not with what it is, but what it could have been, and who it's from — as a debut album from a new band, it would be excusable and acceptable.

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 11:06 AM
You know, Jim both reviews are correct. IMHO "Louisiana Lou" was a throwaway track. I'm guessing "Richard" Betts had used all his best material on his excellent "Highway Call" album. Also, as I said earlier this was the first ABB album that didn't have a strong "band sound" to it. Parts of the album it's Gregg, other parts, it's Dickey. Before "Win, Lose or Draw", people didn't pay much attention to who wrote or sang a particular ABB song, because of the always strong "band performance" of the songs. All one has to do is listen to "Fillmore East", "Eat a Peach" or even "Brothers & Sisters" back to back with "Win, Lose or Draw" to notice how much the ABB. as a band, wasn't as involved as it was on previous albums. Truth is Gregg and Dickey could have brought in some "session guys" and the album wouldn't have sounded all that different.

[Edited on 2/11/2007 by sibwalker]

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 11:14 AM
quote:


And yes, songwriters Tinsley Ellis (Devil for a Dime and others)



I wish someone would book and PROMOTE a TE show here in Louisville

Now back on topic. I still listen to WLD on vinyl. I like the album, I can take or leave Louisiana Lou & Sweet Mama. High Falls is what caused me to put together the instrumental 5 disc deal.

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 03:24 PM
quote:
"Win Lose or Draw" is one of Gregg's greatest compositions. He really "sings it like he means it". And the moaning guitar is wonderful.
Songs like these separate the men from the boys. Only a seasoned singer can pull off the slow songs. And only Gregg could have written and sang this one. Straight from the heart once again.
If you get a chance to hear the version on the 11-25 1975 performance,he's as much that song as I have ever heard.

 

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Brother against brother....

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 04:04 PM
quote:
IMHO "Louisiana Lou" was a throwaway track. Truth is Gregg and Dickey could have brought in some "session guys" and the album wouldn't have sounded all that different.


I have NEVER understood why so many people think of this song as a throwaway track -- but, indeed that's what almost everyone who has ever posted about it, has to say about it.
Actually some "session guys" did play on this, drummers Johnny Sandlin and Bill Stewart -- and Tony Glover's description of the drumming as "syncopated Mexican jumping beans" fits perfectly -- not to mention the tambourine playing when Chuck tears it up to pieces during his solo.
For high energy rollicking roadhouse rock, Louisiana Lou doesn't have to take a back seat to any song -- then again I realize I'm a minority of one about this too!
Fanfrom71, that is a FINE version of Win Lose or Draw -- was at that concert and remember the Providence Civic Center going almost completely quiet as they started playing it.
Speaking of Johnny Sandlin, another version of Win Lose or Draw to check out is the one that appeared on the One More Try anthology (since discontinued) -- it's with Gregg, Johnny and Bonnie Bramlett, and it is one headful of a piece of music -- quite different from the album version.

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 04:15 PM
quote:
"Me too, though not necessarily for the reasons stated in the review. Mistakes aside, Tony's heart was in the right place -- there was no slide guitar playing, however, on Can't Lose What You Never Had, "


Yes there was. Dickey plays slide fills all through the verses of the song, and plays a short little slide solo leading into Chucks long piano solo and his own long solo...normal finger style...at the end.

This clip isint the best example. The slide is back in the background. At other places during the verses its more prominant, but this is the short sample that Amazon.com used.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/music/wma-pop-up/B000003CME001001/105-0202727-5858 023

You might be thinking about the live version on Wipe the Windows. There was no slide on that version.



"D"

[Edited on 2/11/2007 by D28guy]

[Edited on 2/11/2007 by D28guy]

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 06:09 PM
There is slide work on Nevertheless and Sweet Mama. I thought Brothers and Sisters had a couple of throw away songs on it as well - Jelly Jelly and Pony Boy but that record gets more respect because of it's timing and two monster hits. WLD had WLD CLWYNH and HFs which were concert worthy cuts if not hits. Only the DA era did every thing they record be was worthy of concert playing. Together B&S WLD are not bad CDs to have along Wipe the Windows (live) to represent a very important part of this Bands history. One last thing about WLD, both Dickey and Chuck's playing is up to standard and now on cd oppose to back in 75, the recording today on cd format seems more like a nice set of music. I'm listening to it now. It's understandable since Gregg did a solo thing with two releases in 74 on the charts that he was not as prominant on this..

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 07:09 PM
quote:
I have NEVER understood why so many people think of this song as a throwaway track -- but, indeed that's what almost everyone who has ever posted about it, has to say about it.




Stephen,

If you listen to "Louisanna Lou" it's basically "Ramblin Man" with different lyrics. Dickey (or Richard, as he wanted to known as at the time) could certanly come up with a better song than that. But the truth is, back in '75 most of the band was more concerned with being "rock stars" than with making music, and the "Win, Lose and Draw" certainly shows that. IMHO, "Win, Lose and Draw" was an excellent half an album. If the band could have done more songs like "Can't Lose What You Never Had", "Win, Lose or Draw" and "High Falls", then that album would have been considered a classic.

[Edited on 2/12/2007 by sibwalker]

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 07:43 PM
Along with some of the other albums Mark mentioned, Tucker's Searchin' For A Rainbow was released at about the same time as Win Lose or Draw -- what a fine album as well.


Yeah Bro that one was played often on my shows back them. The Live version of "24hrs at a time" is great and it seemed according to the play lists i saved to have been played many time back to back with the fillmores " you don't love me" most likely during my refreshment break " Fire on the moutain" was my morning pick from that album

Elvin Bishops" let it flow" and "juke joint jump" got play from me too as I ignored the Mott the Hoople rquests.

The big surprise for me then as I recall was the bands "Northern lights" after so long they finally came back with a great album.

CLWYNH from WLD opened every one of my shows shows in late septmember and October of 75- morning or night. "High falls" was played often along with "nevertheless" and "WLD". "Just another love song" was on the AM charts at the time so I left that one alone. I was part of progamming crew so those were my recomendations-i still have them highlighted on the album for the DJs to know what was recomended.

BTW I closed most of my shows at the time with Blue Sky . We were trying to hold off disco but we lost, reason I disliked "one of these nights"

[Edited on 2/12/2007 by Bingylandmusic]

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 08:24 PM
quote:
If you listen to "Louisanna Lou" it's basically "Ramblin Man" with different lyrics.


Hi Sibwalker -- I guess that still doesn't help me understand why it's considered such a bust -- yes there is a similar "country ABB style" vibe to it but there's no Chuck solo in Rambling Man, or a long guitar coda that Rambling Man has -- plus Rambling Man was a big hit for the Brothers, so any similarity you'd think would only help popularize it.
Brudda Mark -- thanks for your part in the anti disco cause man! (haha) -- you must've had a blast doing those radio shows (especially during those refreshment breaks!!!) -- good call on Nothern Lights too, I'd forgotten about that one -- both it and Islands, which came afterward IIRC, are underrated Band albums.

 

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  posted on 2/11/2007 at 09:31 PM
Yeah bros, I just listened to" Lou" really loud on my home office shelf’s Bose 301s and I do hear Dickeys voice not having much range- so maybe the RM comparison- but they are completely different songs imo. It’s a tight slick country rocker with Chuck sounding like he is having fun.. The problem was, as much as tight drumming and extended lead picking was the trade mark of the group, so was Gregg’s voice. He should at least have sung on the Billy Joe shaver song"sweet Mama" something Tom Dowd would have insisted on I'm sure. After all, it was a AB album ,not a Dickey album- but forget Dickeys singing on "Lou" and it's a good song with great playing and hard to tell it is not the full group. Maybe not fair to say a throw away song ,but again, not all studio songs make the live play list. I remember reading that Zeppelin wasn’t sure about" Stairway" until they recieved crowd feed back. "Lou" was not on my air play list because there were so many other great ABB songs to choose from- but I feel it works in the overall scheme of listening to WLD- just wish there was more GA vocals and less Dickeys.





[Edited on 2/12/2007 by Bingylandmusic]

 

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Mark

" The Music you listen to becomes the soundtrack of your life"


 
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