Don't click or your IP will be banned


Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band Forum
You are not logged in

< Last Thread   Next Thread >Ascending sortDescending sorting  
Author: Subject: RIP Johnny Podres

Extreme Peach





Posts: 1365
(1365 all sites)
Registered: 1/15/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/14/2008 at 08:57 AM
Johnny Podres, who became a celebrated figure in the storied history of the Brooklyn Dodgers in October 1955, when he pitched them to their only World Series championship, died Sunday at a hospital in Glens Falls, N.Y. Podres, who lived nearby in Queensbury, N.Y., was 75.

His death was announced by his wife, Joan, who said he was being treated for heart and kidney problems and a leg infection.

Podres was hardly a star on a team with Jackie Robinson, Pee Wee Reese, Roy Campanella, Gil Hodges and Duke Snider in the lineup and Don Newcombe and Carl Erskine on the pitching staff. He had been injured twice during the ’55 season and he had a modest record of 9-10 for a team that won the National League pennant by 13 ½ games.

But at 3:43 p.m. on Oct. 4, 1955, Podres proved the man of the hour for Dodgers fans, whose unrealized quest for a World Series championship had been embodied in the refrain “Wait til next year.”

Going into the 1955 season, the Dodgers had won seven pennants and had lost seven times in the World Series. They had been beaten by the Boston Red Sox in 1916, the Cleveland Indians in 1920, and, most painful of all, by the Yankees in 1941, ’47, ’49, ’52 and ’53.

The powerful team that came to be known as the Boys of Summer seemed destined to fall short again in 1955, losing the first two games of the World Series to the Yankees. But Podres won Game 3 on his 23rd birthday, giving up seven hits in an 8-3 victory at Ebbets Field. The Dodgers won the next two games at home, but lost at Yankee Stadium in Game 6.

In a duel of left-handers, Podres was matched against Tommy Byrne in Game 7 at the Stadium. The Dodgers had a 2-0 lead, both runs driven in by Hodges, but in the sixth inning the Yankees had runners on first and second with nobody out when Yogi Berra hit a fly ball toward the left-field line that seemed about to drop for a double. Sandy Amoros, who had just come into the game, replacing Jim Gilliam in left field, saved the day for Brooklyn. After a long run, he reached out for a one-handed catch, then made a relay to Reese, the shortstop, who threw to Hodges, doubling Gil McDougald off first base.

Podres had been effective with his changeup early in the game. As the autumn shadows began to approach home plate, making it tougher for batters to see the pitches, he turned to his fastball. He stopped the Yankees the rest of the way, completing an eight-hitter by retiring them in order in the ninth inning. When Elston Howard grounded to Reese for the final out, Podres was mobbed, and Brooklyn erupted in ecstasy.

“There was a hell of a party that night at the Hotel Bossert in Brooklyn,” Podres told Donald Honig in “The October Heroes.” As Podres recalled it: “Boy, the champagne! There was one guy there who kept telling me he’d been waiting for this since 1916.”

Podres was named the most valuable player of the World Series.

“I guarantee, there was more celebrating in Brooklyn that day than there was for the end of World War II,” Buzzie Bavasi, the Dodgers’ general manager at the time, said a half-century later.

Podres was born and raised in Witherbee, N.Y., in the Adirondack region where his father mined iron ore. He grew up a Dodgers fan, listening to Red Barber’s broadcasts, signed with the Brooklyn organization out of high school and made his debut with the Dodgers in 1953.

He won 9 games as a rookie, 11 in his second season, then endured a disappointing summer in ’55. He injured his shoulder and later sustained bruised ribs in an incident that, as baseball lore would have it, could happen only in Brooklyn. He was struck by the Ebbets Field batting cage while groundskeepers were moving it during a pregame workout. But then came the October of his lifetime.

Podres became a leading pitcher for the Dodgers in the years that followed. He led the N.L. in earned run average, at 2.66, and shutouts, with six, in 1957, the Dodgers’ final year in Brooklyn, and was a consistent winner when they moved to Los Angeles. He had an 18-5 record in 1961 with a league-leading winning percentage of .783. He pitched in four World Series and he was an All-Star three times.

Podres was traded to the Detroit Tigers in 1966, and also pitched for the San Diego Padres. He had a record of 148-116 in 15 major league seasons.

He was later a pitching coach for the Minnesota Twins and the Philadelphia Phillies.

In addition to his wife, Podres is survived by his sons, John Jr., of Queensbury, and Joseph, of Fort Myers, Fla.; and his brothers, Thomas, of Watervliet, N.Y., and Walter, of California.

Byrne, his pitching opponent in Game 7 of the ’55 World Series, died last month at 87.

For all of Podres’s achievements, his day in the sun would always be that afternoon at Yankee Stadium in October 1955.

“Sometimes when I’m home doing nothing, I’ll put the video in,” he told The Philadelphia Inquirer 50 years later. “I get the feeling that I’m young again. What a time that was.”


 

____________________
http://db.etree.org/baldvinny

 
E-Mail User Visit User's Homepage
Replies:

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 8312
(8312 all sites)
Registered: 10/12/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/14/2008 at 09:09 AM
Thanks for posting this. I was a kid in L.A. when Podres was still pitching for the then L.A. Dodgers in the sixties. Their four man rotation was Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, Claude Osteen and Johnny Podres and their short relief man was Ron Perranoski. With a staff like that, if you gave the Dodgers two or three runs, you usually lost!
RIP Johnny Podres.

 

____________________
Don't let the sounds of your own wheels
Drive you crazy
Lighten up while you still can
Don't even try to understand
Just find a place to take your stand
And TAKE IT EASY

 





Karma:
Posts: 2804
(0 all sites)
Registered: 7/29/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/14/2008 at 09:41 AM
Hey Vincenzo...good post.
One of my uncles was a big Dodger fan, in a family of Bronx born Yankee fan's, and hunted not far from where he lived.
We hated the Dodgers growing up, but have to pay respect.
RIP Johnny...you'll alway's be a Boy of Summer.

 

____________________

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 16027
(16019 all sites)
Registered: 10/13/2007
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/14/2008 at 10:16 AM

In six World Series starts, he was 4-1 with a 2.11...Interesting, too, where he ended his career - Podres with the Padres...

 

____________________

 

Universal Peach



Karma:
Posts: 5944
(6041 all sites)
Registered: 1/24/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/14/2008 at 10:48 AM
quote:
Thanks for posting this. I was a kid in L.A. when Podres was still pitching for the then L.A. Dodgers in the sixties. Their four man rotation was Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, Claude Osteen and Johnny Podres and their short relief man was Ron Perranoski. With a staff like that, if you gave the Dodgers two or three runs, you usually lost!
RIP Johnny Podres.

Not much to do growing up in my little town, but I was a big Dodgers fan, could get them on A.M. radio when they played in Houston, St. Louis, Chicago, Pittsburgh, later Atlanta. This was my favorite rotation, favorite staff. Perhaps the greatest of all-time.
The Dodgers couldn't hit their way out of a wet paper bag. But they didn't need to.
Walter Alston was a genious at working with what he had.

May Johnny Podres rest in peace. Thanks for the memories.

 
E-Mail User

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 16027
(16019 all sites)
Registered: 10/13/2007
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/14/2008 at 10:59 AM
quote:
quote:
Thanks for posting this. I was a kid in L.A. when Podres was still pitching for the then L.A. Dodgers in the sixties. Their four man rotation was Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, Claude Osteen and Johnny Podres and their short relief man was Ron Perranoski. With a staff like that, if you gave the Dodgers two or three runs, you usually lost!
RIP Johnny Podres.

Not much to do growing up in my little town, but I was a big Dodgers fan, could get them on A.M. radio when they played in Houston, St. Louis, Chicago, Pittsburgh, later Atlanta. This was my favorite rotation, favorite staff. Perhaps the greatest of all-time.
The Dodgers couldn't hit their way out of a wet paper bag. But they didn't need to.
Walter Alston was a genious at working with what he had.

May Johnny Podres rest in peace. Thanks for the memories.


What was it like playing LA in those days? You already mentioned the pitching...Here was a typical Dodger inning in those days-

Wills leadoff walk, or bunt for base hit
Wills steals second
SAC Wills to third
Wills scores on 4-3 groundout

Dodgers already ahead 1-0 wtihout hitting a ball out of the infield...

 

____________________

 

Universal Peach



Karma:
Posts: 5944
(6041 all sites)
Registered: 1/24/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/14/2008 at 11:34 AM
quote:
quote:
quote:
Thanks for posting this. I was a kid in L.A. when Podres was still pitching for the then L.A. Dodgers in the sixties. Their four man rotation was Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, Claude Osteen and Johnny Podres and their short relief man was Ron Perranoski. With a staff like that, if you gave the Dodgers two or three runs, you usually lost!
RIP Johnny Podres.

Not much to do growing up in my little town, but I was a big Dodgers fan, could get them on A.M. radio when they played in Houston, St. Louis, Chicago, Pittsburgh, later Atlanta. This was my favorite rotation, favorite staff. Perhaps the greatest of all-time.
The Dodgers couldn't hit their way out of a wet paper bag. But they didn't need to.
Walter Alston was a genious at working with what he had.

May Johnny Podres rest in peace. Thanks for the memories.


What was it like playing LA in those days? You already mentioned the pitching...Here was a typical Dodger inning in those days-

Wills leadoff walk, or bunt for base hit
Wills steals second
SAC Wills to third
Wills scores on 4-3 groundout

Dodgers already ahead 1-0 wtihout hitting a ball out of the infield...


There used to be a scorecard of Koufax's perfect game, painted about 2 stories high on the windows of The Mint hotel in Las Vegas, I was listening. They were playing the Cubs, I believe Bill Hands pitched for the Cubs.

Wills led off the game, walked. Sacrificed to second. Stole third, throw goes into the outfield, he scores. In the seventh, Willie Davis hit a pop fly over third, it hit on the chalk line for a double.

That was it. No other runners reached base. Chicago allowed one hit, two base runners.
Nobody reached on Koufax. The greatest game ever pitched, at least statistically. Had Davis's pop fly been one inch to the left, there would have been 2 no-hitters, only one base runner in the entire game. Pre-steroids.

 
E-Mail User

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1365
(1365 all sites)
Registered: 1/15/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/14/2008 at 01:23 PM
quote:
Wills leadoff walk, or bunt for base hit
Wills steals second
SAC Wills to third
Wills scores on 4-3 groundout

Dodgers already ahead 1-0 wtihout hitting a ball out of the infield...



i wish teams these days still played ball like this. its callled MANUFACTURING runs, not waiting on someone to knock it into next tuesday.......


in other news, i was up at yankee stadium today, to shoot something for NBC. man, there are a LOT of changes in the area......

 

____________________
http://db.etree.org/baldvinny

 
E-Mail User

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 13909
(15926 all sites)
Registered: 3/14/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/14/2008 at 01:32 PM
always cool that Johnny Podres pitched for the Padres..

RIP man

 

____________________

 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1558
(1568 all sites)
Registered: 2/14/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/14/2008 at 05:13 PM
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
Thanks for posting this. I was a kid in L.A. when Podres was still pitching for the then L.A. Dodgers in the sixties. Their four man rotation was Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, Claude Osteen and Johnny Podres and their short relief man was Ron Perranoski. With a staff like that, if you gave the Dodgers two or three runs, you usually lost!
RIP Johnny Podres.

Not much to do growing up in my little town, but I was a big Dodgers fan, could get them on A.M. radio when they played in Houston, St. Louis, Chicago, Pittsburgh, later Atlanta. This was my favorite rotation, favorite staff. Perhaps the greatest of all-time.
The Dodgers couldn't hit their way out of a wet paper bag. But they didn't need to.
Walter Alston was a genious at working with what he had.

May Johnny Podres rest in peace. Thanks for the memories.


What was it like playing LA in those days? You already mentioned the pitching...Here was a typical Dodger inning in those days-

Wills leadoff walk, or bunt for base hit
Wills steals second
SAC Wills to third
Wills scores on 4-3 groundout

Dodgers already ahead 1-0 wtihout hitting a ball out of the infield...


There used to be a scorecard of Koufax's perfect game, painted about 2 stories high on the windows of The Mint hotel in Las Vegas, I was listening. They were playing the Cubs, I believe Bill Hands pitched for the Cubs.

Wills led off the game, walked. Sacrificed to second. Stole third, throw goes into the outfield, he scores. In the seventh, Willie Davis hit a pop fly over third, it hit on the chalk line for a double.

That was it. No other runners reached base. Chicago allowed one hit, two base runners.
Nobody reached on Koufax. The greatest game ever pitched, at least statistically. Had Davis's pop fly been one inch to the left, there would have been 2 no-hitters, only one base runner in the entire game. Pre-steroids.


Here was a typical Dodger game for me when I was a kid. I was at the Dodgers/Cubs game in May '65...Cubs pitcher Dick Ellsworth had a no-hitter going for 7 innings, but only a 1-0 lead (Claude Osteen was pitching for the Dodgers). Bottom of the 8th, Jeff Torborg got on on a Ron Santo error, (replaced by pinch runner Willie Crawford), Dick Tracewski tried to sacrifice Crawford to second but Santo tried to get Crawford at second, too late, runners on first & second. John Kennedy, pinch hitting for Darrell Griffith, sacrificed, both runners advancing. Al Ferrara then pinch hit for Bob Miller who'd replaced Osteen in the top of the 8th. Ferrara lined a shot down the left field line hitting the left field foul pole about 10 feet in front of me & my dad for a 3-run homerun. Maury Wills grounded out, Wes Parker walked but was thrown out trying to steal second to end the inning. Three runs, one hit, nobody left. Jim Brewer pitched the 9th and retired the Cubs in order. Dodgers win 3-1 getting only one hit.

The whole manic season was like that. Even after you got past Koufax & Drysdale, there was still Osteen & Podres. Pretty rare to have 3 lefties in your starting rotation.



[Edited on 1/16/2008 by chiliD]

 
E-Mail User

A Peach Supreme



Karma:
Posts: 2806
(2809 all sites)
Registered: 3/25/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/14/2008 at 05:49 PM
he gave those bums from Brooklyn their only World Series, ahh he beat my Yankees yhat year... but kudos to Johnny Podres.. RIP

 

____________________
https://images.app.goo.gl/68fjWFscMt4d6hED9
http://www.e-z-2-win.com/hats.htm

 

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4213
(4421 all sites)
Registered: 1/18/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/14/2008 at 06:11 PM
As an avid Phillies Phan I appreciated the Job Johnny Did with the pitching staff her in Philadelphia for several years.

 

____________________
Philadelphia Phillies 2008 World Series Champions.

 
E-Mail User

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1365
(1365 all sites)
Registered: 1/15/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/14/2008 at 07:20 PM
i love reading about people's memories of baseball....

 

____________________
http://db.etree.org/baldvinny

 
E-Mail User

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1365
(1365 all sites)
Registered: 1/15/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/15/2008 at 12:07 PM
Johnny Podres is the third member of the 1993 Phillies coaching staff to pass away in the last year, following Mel Roberts and John Vukovich

 

____________________
http://db.etree.org/baldvinny

 
E-Mail User

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 82650
(83009 all sites)
Registered: 4/16/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/15/2008 at 12:10 PM
quote:
quote:
Wills leadoff walk, or bunt for base hit
Wills steals second
SAC Wills to third
Wills scores on 4-3 groundout

Dodgers already ahead 1-0 wtihout hitting a ball out of the infield...



i wish teams these days still played ball like this. its callled MANUFACTURING runs, not waiting on someone to knock it into next tuesday.......


in other news, i was up at yankee stadium today, to shoot something for NBC. man, there are a LOT of changes in the area......


Soon to be a BIG one bro

 

____________________
RIP Cindy Fischer
RIP Hugh Duty
RIP John Ott

 

Super Moderator



Karma:
Posts: 3870
(3929 all sites)
Registered: 6/17/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/15/2008 at 01:06 PM

I was six years old in 1955 and that Dodgers vs. Yankees series is the first I remember. I lived in Southern Indiana and had no local team to root for, so my little kid brain soaked up the image of my dad cheering on the Dodgers. From then on, the Dodgers were my team.

Unfortunately, what I didn't understand at age six was that my dad HATED the Dodgers. Despised them. He was a died-in-the-wool Cardinals fan. It's just that he hated the Yankees worse!

Too late. After that series I was imprinted, and I remained a Dodgers fan for years after. I even had a Johnny Podres 1955 baseball card and he was my favorite player. The card is long gone now, but I still have fond memories of that year.





[Edited on 1/15/2008 by Hophead]

 

____________________
"Don't Ask Why"

 
E-Mail User

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1162
(1162 all sites)
Registered: 3/19/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/15/2008 at 01:30 PM
quote:
There used to be a scorecard of Koufax's perfect game, painted about 2 stories high on the windows of The Mint hotel in Las Vegas, I was listening. They were playing the Cubs, I believe Bill Hands pitched for the Cubs

It was actually Bob Hendley who also pitched some for the Mets. Amazing site to check out boxscores for the last 50 years is retrosheet.com .

I was almost five when Podres pulled off his feat vs the Yankees. One of my earliest memories is my dad watching the Dodgers vs Yankees in the World Series during that era. Sad to see these boyish heroes pass away. Just learned of the death of Don Cardwell, one of the key members of the Mets 1969 pitching rotation. Ah, what a time it was!


[Edited on 1/15/2008 by dzobo]

[Edited on 1/15/2008 by dzobo]

 

____________________
Wake up to find out that you are the eyes of the world.
 
E-Mail User

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1534
(1534 all sites)
Registered: 11/21/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/15/2008 at 02:29 PM
R.I.P. Johnny Podres.
 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 14593
(14593 all sites)
Registered: 3/28/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/15/2008 at 02:33 PM
RIP

 

____________________
Pete

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 23381
(23380 all sites)
Registered: 12/27/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/15/2008 at 02:44 PM
quote:
As an avid Phillies Phan I appreciated the Job Johnny Did with the pitching staff her in Philadelphia for several years.


Amen. The 1993 Phils wouldn't have gotten very far if it wasn't for Johnny Podres holding that patchwork quilt of a pitching staff together.

 

____________________
Quit!

 

Universal Peach



Karma:
Posts: 5944
(6041 all sites)
Registered: 1/24/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 1/15/2008 at 04:40 PM
quote:

I was six years old in 1955 and that Dodgers vs. Yankees series is the first I remember. I lived in Southern Indiana and had no local team to root for, so my little kid brain soaked up the image of my dad cheering on the Dodgers. From then on, the Dodgers were my team.

Unfortunately, what I didn't understand at age six was that my dad HATED the Dodgers. Despised them. He was a died-in-the-wool Cardinals fan. It's just that he hated the Yankees worse!

Too late. After that series I was imprinted, and I remained a Dodgers fan for years after. I even had a Johnny Podres 1955 baseball card and he was my favorite player. The card is long gone now, but I still have fond memories of that year.

Almost identical to my story, Ron....I was seven, we had just gotten our first TV. Turned out my Dad was a fan of Cleveland, and the White Sox. But I stuck with the Dodgers.





[Edited on 1/15/2008 by Hophead]

 
E-Mail User
 


Powered by XForum 1.81.1 by Trollix Software

Privacy | Terms of Service | Report Infringement | Personal Data Management | Contact Us
The ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND name, The ALLMAN BROTHERS name, likenesses, logos, mushroom design and peach truck are all registered trademarks of THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. whose rights are specifically reserved. Any artwork, visual, or audio representations used on this web site CONTAINING ANY REGISTERED TRADEMARKS are under license from The ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. A REVOCABLE, GRATIS LICENSE IS GRANTED TO ALL REGISTERED PEACH CORP MEMBERS FOR The DOWNLOADING OF ONE COPY FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. ANY DISTRIBUTION OR REPRODUCTION OF THE TRADEMARKS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE PROHIBITED AND ARE SPECIFICALLY RESERVED BY THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO.,INC.
site by Hittin' the Web Group with www.experiencewasabi3d.com